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VisitGZM Map

VisitGZM features more than 350 sites showcasing the diversity of the GZM and demonstrating the range of leisure activities and interests on offer.

In the GZM, you will find various exciting places depending on your interests: there are cultural venues (cinema, music, theatre, painting and design), recreational areas, sports and active recreation, souvenirs – Judaica, monuments from the distant past such as the Middle Ages, but above all, an enormous post-industrial heritage.

The map is divided into 6 categories: 1) monuments, modern architecture, 2) industrial heritage, 3) culture, 4) sports and recreation, 5) attractions (other), 6) cultural routes, with each divided into subcategories (some places are included in two or more categories, such as sites of the Industrial Monuments Route).

Using the filter options, you can select the subcategories of interest. Additional filter options are available in the side menu.

In compiling the map, materials made available on the official websites of the sites and institutions were used, as well as other sources and materials, including principally the following websites:

Complementing the content of VisitGZM, showing the variety of leisure offerings, is GreenGZM with GZM parks and squares.

Spodek Sports And Entertainment Arena

Contemporary

Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 35

Spodek Sports And Entertainment Arena

Entertainment and Sports Arenas and Stadiums

Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 35

The Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR),

Contemporary

Katowice, plac Wojciecha Kilara 1

Silesian Museum

Contemporary

Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1

Nikiszowiec Housing Estate

Company-sponsored Architecture

Katowice, os. Nikiszowiec (ul. św. Anny)

Valley of Three Ponds (Katowice Forest Park)

Walking and Recreation

Katowice, ul. Trzech Stawów

Culture Zone

Revitalised

Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego / pl. Sławika i Antala

Silesian Museum

Revitalised

Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1

Silesian Freedom and Solidarity Centre and the Monument to the Wujek Nine

Revitalised

Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38

The Monument to the Wujek Nine

Sculptures and Monuments

Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38

Culture Zone

Contemporary

Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego / pl. Sławika i Antala

Fabryka Porcelany

Revitalised

Katowice, ul. Porcelanowa 23

Old Railway Station

Revitalised

Katowice, ul. Dworcowa

Wilson Shaft Gallery

Revitalised

Katowice, ul. Oswobodzenia 1

Mokrski Brewery

Revitalised

Katowice, ul. ks. bpa Bednorza 2a-6

Pułaski Shaft and Wieczorek Mine buildings

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Katowice, ul. Szopienicka

International Congress Centre (MCK)

Contemporary

Katowice, plac Sławika i Antalla 1

Superjednostka

Contemporary

Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 16-32

“Walcownia” Museum of Zinc Metallurgy

Industry of the Past

Katowice, ul. 11 Listopada 50

Gallows frame of the Warsaw II shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1

Water tower at J. Korczak Street.

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Katowice, ul. J. Korczaka

Jerzy (Jorg) Shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Katowice, ul. Chorzowska 107

Giszowiec Housing Estate

Company-sponsored Architecture

Katowice, os. Giszowiec

Krzysztof Kieślowski Film School (Faculty of Radio and Television, University of Silesia)

Contemporary

Katowice, ul. Świętego Pawła 7A

Municipal colony of the “Wujek” mine (Oheim).

Company-sponsored Architecture

Katowice, ul. J. Poniatowskiego, B. Głowackiego, Skalna, Barbary

Katowice-Kostuchna Dormitory (now the seat of the Municipal Cultural Centre “South”)

Company-sponsored Architecture

Katowice, ul. T. B. Żeleńskiego 83

Symfonia Centre for Music Learning and Education

Contemporary

Katowice, ul. Zacisze 3

“Maize” on the Tysiąclecia Estate

Contemporary

Katowice, ul. Zawiszy Czarnego

Cleophas (Kleofas) mine workers’ house

Company-sponsored Architecture

Katowice, ul. Gliwicka 204

Eastern Shaft No. II, formerly Kleofas Coal Mine

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Katowice, ul. F. Bocheńskiego 66

Former zinc works

Non-Revitalised

Katowice, ul. Ks. mjra Karola Woźniaka

Pułaski Shaft and Wieczorek Mine buildings

Non-Revitalised

Katowice, ul. Szopienicka

Company-sponsored Housing Estate of the Warsaw Society of Coal Mines and Steel Works

Company-sponsored Architecture

Sosnowiec, ul. Klubowa

Water tower at Leśna Street in Gliwice

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Gliwice, ul. Leśna

Gwiazdy Housing Estate (Walentego Roździeński Housing Estate)

Contemporary

Katowice, al. W. Roździeńskiego 86, 88, 90, 96, 98, 100

Office buildings .KTW

Contemporary

Katowice, al. Walentego Roździeńskiego 1

Stalexport buildings – top-down construction

Contemporary

Katowice, ul. A. Mickiewicza 29

Scientific Information Centre and Academic Library (CINiBA)

Contemporary

Katowice, ul. Bankowa 11a

Silesian Freedom and Solidarity Centre and the Monument to the Wujek Nine

Heritage and Historic Sites

Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38

Academy of Music in Katowice

Heritage and Historic Sites

Katowice, ul. Zacisze 3

Former home of the Silesian Museum

Heritage and Historic Sites

Katowice, ul. Korfantego 3

Spodek Sports And Entertainment Arena

Entertainment and Sports Arenas and Stadiums

Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 35

New Gliwice

Revitalised

Gliwice, ul. Bojkowska 37

Starganiec

Beaches and Bodies of Water

Mikołów, ul. Owsiana / Katowice

Recreation Center “Zadole”

Beaches and Bodies of Water

Katowice, ul. Wczasowa 8

Skatepark PTG

Skateparks and Pump Tracks

Katowice, Pomnik Trudu Górniczego, ul. Górnośląska 57

Silesian Aero Club

Aviation

Katowice, ul. Lotnisko 1

Zagłębiowski Sports Park – ArcelorMittal Park

Entertainment and Sports Arenas and Stadiums

Sosnowiec, ul. gen. Mariusza Zaruskiego 2

Wake Zone Stawiki

Water Sports

Sosnowiec, ul. Jana III Sobieskiego 49

Winter Stadium

Ice Rinks

Sosnowiec, ul. Zamkowa 4

Old Wire Factory

Non-Revitalised

Gliwice, ul. Stanisława Dubois 45c

Climbing Wall “Level 450”

Climbing

Sosnowiec, ul. Narutowicza 51

Silesian Museum

Industrial Monuments Route

Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1

Nikiszowiec Housing Estate

Industrial Monuments Route

Katowice, os. Nikiszowiec (ul. św. Anny)

Giszowiec Housing Estate

Industrial Monuments Route

Katowice, os. Giszowiec

“Walcownia” Museum of Zinc Metallurgy

Industrial Monuments Route

Katowice, ul. 11 Listopada 50

Fabryka Porcelany

Industrial Monuments Route

Katowice, ul. Porcelanowa 23

Radio station

Industrial Monuments Route

Gliwice, ul. Tarnogórska 127-129-131

Wilson Shaft Gallery

Industrial Monuments Route

Katowice, ul. Oswobodzenia 1

Museum of Sanitary Technology

Industrial Monuments Route

Gliwice, ul. Edisona 16

Artistic Foundry Branch of the Museum in Gliwice

Industrial Monuments Route

Gliwice, ul. Bojkowska 37

Queen Louise Adit

Industrial Monuments Route

Zabrze, ul. Wolności 408

Historic Maciej Shaft

Industrial Monuments Route

Zabrze, ul. Srebrna 6

Guido mine

Industrial Monuments Route

Zabrze, ul. 3 Maja 93

“Bajtel Gruba” – Park 12 C

Industrial Monuments Route

Zabrze, ul. Maurycego Mochnackiego 12

Szombierki Heat and Power Plan

Industrial Monuments Route

Bytom, ul. Kosynierów 30

Upper Silesian Narrow-Gauge Railways

Industrial Monuments Route

Bytom, ul. Reja 1

Ficinus Housing Estate

Industrial Monuments Route

Ruda Śląska, ul. Kubiny

Visitor Centre of Tyskie Browary Książęce

Industrial Monuments Route

Tychy, ul. Katowicka 9

Obywatelski Brewery (Tichauer)

Industrial Monuments Route

Tychy, ul. Browarowa 7

Sztygarka City Museum

Industrial Monuments Route

Dąbrowa Górnicza, ul. Legionów Polskich 69

Prezydent shaft, Sztygarka complex

Industrial Monuments Route

Chorzów, ul. Piotra Skargi 34 a/d

Central Museum of Firefighting

Industrial Monuments Route

Mysłowice, ul. Stadionowa 7a

Silesian Puppet and Actor Theater “Ateneum”

For Children

Katowice, ul. św. Jana 10

The Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR),

Concerts and Music Performances

Katowice, plac Wojciecha Kilara 1

International Congress Centre (MCK)

Multi-Purpose Venues

Katowice, plac Sławika i Antalla 1

Silesian Museum

Museums

Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1

Silesian Freedom and Solidarity Centre and the Monument to the Wujek Nine

Museums

Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38

“Walcownia” Museum of Zinc Metallurgy

Museums

Katowice, ul. 11 Listopada 50

Silesian Philharmonic

Concerts and Music Performances

Katowice, ul. Sokolska 2

Symfonia Centre for Music Learning and Education

Concerts and Music Performances

Katowice, ul. Zacisze 3

Silesian Theatre

Theathres

Katowice, ul. Rynek 10

Korez Theatre

Theathres

Katowice, plac Sejmu Śląskiego 2

Silesian Puppet and Actor Theater “Ateneum”

Theathres

Katowice, ul. św. Jana 10

Kleks’ Fairy Tale (Bajka Pana Kleksa)

For Children

Katowice, ul. Porcelanowa 23

“Światowid” Studio Cinema

Art Cinemas

Katowice, ul. 3 Maja 7

Rialto Cinema

Art Cinemas

Katowice, ul. św. Jana 24

„Kosmos” Studio Cinema

Art Cinemas

Katowice, ul. Sokolska 66

Rondo Sztuki Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Katowice

Art Galleries

Katowice, Rondo im. gen. Jerzego Ziętka 1

Flyspot

Aero tunnel

Katowice, ul. Chorzowska 100

Wilson Shaft Gallery

Art Galleries

Katowice, ul. Oswobodzenia 1

Katowice City of Gardens – Cultural Institution

Multi-Purpose Venues

Katowice, plac Sejmu Śląskiego 2

Mining and Metallurgy Tradition Park

Industrial Monuments Route

Siemianowice Śląskie, ul. Elizy Orzeszkowej 12

The Zagłębie Theater

Theathres

Sosnowiec, ul. Teatralna 4

Black Trout Adit

Heritage and Historic Sites

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Szczęść Boże 81

Black Trout Adit

Industrial Monuments Route

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Szczęść Boże 81

Sosnowiec Museum (Schoen Park and Palace Complex)

Museums

Sosnowiec, ul. Chemiczna

“Arena Gliwice” entertainment and sports hall – PreZero Arena Gliwice

Entertainment and Sports Arenas and Stadiums

Gliwice, ul. Akademicka 50

Municipal Theater in Gliwice

Theathres

Gliwice, ul. Nowy Świat 55-57

Artistic Foundry Branch of the Museum in Gliwice

Museums

Gliwice, ul. Bojkowska 37

Historic Silver Mine

Industrial Monuments Route

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Repecka

Historic Silver Mine

Heritage and Historic Sites

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Repecka

Museum of Sanitary Technology

Museums

Gliwice, ul. Edisona 16

Willa Caro – Gliwice Museum

Museums

Gliwice, ul. Dolnych Wałów 8a

AMOK Cinema

Art Cinemas

Gliwice, ul. Dolnych Wałów 3

Gallows frame of the Poland Coal Mine

Industrial Monuments Route

Świętochłowice, ul. Wojska Polskiego 16

Upper Silesian Jews House of Remembrance

Museums

Gliwice, ul. Poniatowskiego 14

The House of Music and Dance in Zabrze

Multi-Purpose Venues

Zabrze, ul. Gen. de Gaulle’a 17

“Elektrownia” Contemporary Art Gallery

Industrial Monuments Route

Czeladź, ul. Dehnelów 45

Energy Museum

Industrial Monuments Route

Łaziska Górne, ul. Wyzwolenia 30

Coal Mining Museum

Museums

Zabrze, 3 Maja 19

Carboneum – Knowledge Centre For Coal

Museums

Zabrze, ul. Jana Zamoyskiego 2

Zabrze Philharmonic

Concerts and Music Performances

Zabrze, Park Hutniczy 7

Museum of Bread, School and Curiosities

Industrial Monuments Route

Radzionków, ul. Zofii Nałkowskiej 5

Teatr Nowy

Theathres

Zabrze, plac Teatralny 1

Zawada-Karchowice Water Supply Network Station

Industrial Monuments Route

Karchowice , ul. Bytomska 6

Silesian Opera

Concerts and Music Performances

Bytom, ul. S. Moniuszki 21

The wooden church of St. Valentine in Bieruń Stary

Wooden Architecture Route

Bieruń, ul. Krakowska 39

Upper Silesian Museum

Museums

Bytom, pl. Jana III Sobieskiego 2

ROZBARK Theatre

Theathres

Bytom, ul. Wojciecha Kilara 29

The wooden church of St Lawrence in Bobrowniki

Wooden Architecture Route

Bobrowniki, ul. Henryka Sienkiewicza 224

Museum of the People’s Republic of Poland

Museums

Ruda Śląska, ul. Zajęcza 42

Obywatelski Brewery (Tichauer)

Museums

Tychy, ul. Browarowa 7

Visitor Centre of Tyskie Browary Książęce

Museums

Tychy, ul. Katowicka 9

Teatr Mały

Theathres

Tychy, ul. ks. kard. Augusta Hlonda 1

Palace of Culture of the Zagłębie Region

Multi-Purpose Venues

Dąbrowa Górnicza, plac Wolności 1

Sztygarka City Museum

Museums

Dąbrowa Górnicza, ul. Legionów Polskich 69

Museum of Steelwork

Museums

Chorzów, ul. Metalowców 4a

Ethnographic Park in Chorzów

Museums

Chorzów, ul. Parkowa 25

Silesian Voivodeship Office and Silesian Parliament Building

Modernism

Katowice, ul. Jagiellońska 25

Teatr Rozrywki

Theathres

Chorzów, ul. Marii Konopnickiej 1

Teatr Rozrywki

Concerts and Music Performances

Chorzów, ul. Marii Konopnickiej 1

Central Museum of Firefighting

Museums

Mysłowice, ul. Stadionowa 7a

Open-air Museum of Steam Engines

Museums

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Szczęść Boże 79H

Tarnowskie Góry Museum

Museums

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Rynek 1

Zagłębie Museum

Museums

Będzin, ul. Zamkowa 1

Museum of the Silesian Uprisings

Museums

Świętochłowice, ul. Wiktora Polaka 1

“Elektrownia” Contemporary Art Gallery

Art Galleries

Czeladź, ul. Dehnelów 45

Open-air railway museum

Museums

Pyskowice, ul. Piaskowa 1

Energy Museum

Museums

Łaziska Górne, ul. Wyzwolenia 30

Centre of Documentation of Upper Silesians Deportation to the USSR in 1945

Museums

Radzionków, św. Wojciecha 118

Museum of Bread, School and Curiosities

Museums

Radzionków, ul. Zofii Nałkowskiej 5

The wooden church of St Nicholas in Mikołów

Wooden Architecture Route

Mikołów, ul. Gliwicka 354

“Chudów Castle” Museum

Museums

Chudów, ul. Podzamcze 6

Artistic Foundry Branch of the Museum in Gliwice

Industry of the Past

Gliwice, ul. Bojkowska 37

Marina Gliwice

Water Sports

Gliwice, ul. Portowa 28

The wooden church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Wooden Architecture Route

Sałsza, ul. Kościelna 78

Revitalised

Gliwice, ul. Zygmunta Starego 24A

The wooden Church of the Nativity of St John the Baptist and Our Lady of Czestochowa in Poniszowice

Wooden Architecture Route

Poniszowice, ul. Parkowa 5

Museum of Sanitary Technology

Water and Rail Infrastructure

Gliwice, ul. Edisona 16

Queen Louise Adit

Industry of the Past

Zabrze, ul. Wolności 408

Guido mine

Industry of the Past

Zabrze, ul. 3 Maja 93

Historic Maciej Shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Zabrze, ul. Srebrna 6

Water tower of the Carboneum coal knowledge centre

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Zabrze, ul. Jana Zamoyskiego 2

The wooden church of St Michael the Archangel in Katowice

Wooden Architecture Route

Katowice, ul. Kościuszki 112

Łańcuszkowa bathhouse of the Queen Louise mine and Park 12c

Industry of the Past

Zabrze, ul. Wolności 410

Borsigwerk Workers’ Colony (Borsiga Estate)

Company-sponsored Architecture

Zabrze, ul. Stefana Okrzei, św. Wojciecha

The Ballestrem Workers’ Housing Estate

Company-sponsored Architecture

Zabrze, ul. Szafarczyka, Nowowiejskiego, Andersa

Workers’ housing estate Kolonia B

Company-sponsored Architecture

Zabrze, ul. Lompy, Wiejska, Bogusławskiego, Wróblewskiego

Donnersmarck Workers’ Housing Estate “Zandka”

Company-sponsored Architecture

Zabrze, os. Zdanka (ul. Cmentarna)

Steel House

Company-sponsored Architecture

Zabrze, ul. Cmentarna 7

Szombierki Heat and Power Plan

Non-Revitalised

Bytom, ul. Kosynierów 30

Bobrek ironworks’ power plant building

Non-Revitalised

Bytom, ul. Konstytucji 61

Historic Rozbark Mine and Bończyk Shaft

Revitalised

Bytom, ul. Chorzowska 12

Krystyna Shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Bytom, ul. Zabrzańska 7

Water tower in Bytom

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Bytom, ul. Oświęcimska 27/29

Bobrek Workers’ Colonies I, II, and III (also known as the New Workers’ Colony)

Company-sponsored Architecture

Bytom, ul. Czajkowskiego, Olszewskiego, Jachymczyka, Stelmacha, Żwirowa

The wooden church of St Michael the Archangel in Księży Las

Wooden Architecture Route

Księży Las, ul. Wiejska 2

Zgorzelec Colony

Company-sponsored Architecture

Bytom, ul. Kolonia Zgorzelec 13

Bolko Loft

Revitalised

Bytom, ul. Kruszcowa 4a

Upper Silesian Narrow-Gauge Railways

Water and Rail Infrastructure

Bytom, ul. Reja 1

Library station

Revitalised

Ruda Śląska, ul. Dworcowa 33

The Great Blast Furnace in Nowy Bytom

Non-Revitalised

Ruda Śląska, ul. Niedurnego 79

Kaufhaus department store

Revitalised

Ruda Śląska, ul. Piotra Niedurnego 99

Revitalised zinc spoil heap in Ruda Śląska

Revitalised

Ruda Śląska, ul. 1 Maja

Site of the former Orzegów Coking Plant

Revitalised

Ruda Śląska, ul. Kard. Augusta Hlonda 52

The wooden church of St Hedwig

Wooden Architecture Route

Zabrze, ul. Wolności 504

Mikołaj Shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Ruda Śląska, ul. Szyb Walenty

The wooden Evangelical church

Wooden Architecture Route

Zabrze, ul. Brygadzistów 14

The workers’ housing estate with the Kaufhaus department store

Company-sponsored Architecture

Ruda Śląska, ul. Niedurnego

The wooden church of St Bartholomew

Wooden Architecture Route

Sośnicowice, ul. Kościelna 1

Ficinus Housing Estate

Company-sponsored Architecture

Ruda Śląska, ul. Kubiny

The wooden church of St Catherine of Alexandria in Sierakowice

Wooden Architecture Route

Sierakowice, ul. Wiejska 2

The workers’ housing estate located on Wieniawskiego, Wolności, Staszica, and Kościelna Streets

Company-sponsored Architecture

Ruda Śląska, ul. Wieniawskiego, Wolności, Staszica i Kościelna

Carl-Emanuel Colonie (also known as Karmańskie)

Company-sponsored Architecture

Ruda Śląska, ul. Raciborska, Zabrzańska, Wolności

Andrzej Shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Ruda Śląska, ul. Obrońców Westerplatte, ul. Odrodzenia

Franciszek Shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Ruda Śląska, ul. Konopnickiej 18

The Living Factory

Revitalised

Dąbrowa Górnicza, ul. T. Kościuszki 3/101

Museum of Steelwork

Industry of the Past

Chorzów, ul. Metalowców 4a

Prezydent shaft, Sztygarka complex

Revitalised

Chorzów, ul. Piotra Skargi 34 a/d

Kościuszko Lofts

Revitalised

Chorzów, ul. Metalowców 13

The wooden church of the Holy Trinity in Rachowice

Wooden Architecture Route

Rachowice, ul. Rachowicka 5/1

Workers’ colony on Kalidego Street

Company-sponsored Architecture

Chorzów, ul. Kalidego

Chorzów-Batory housing development

Company-sponsored Architecture

Chorzów, ul. Batorego, Karłowicza, Szczepańska

The wooden church of St Michael the Archangel in Rudziniec

Wooden Architecture Route

Rudziniec, ul. Lipowa 52

Elżbieta Shaft

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Chorzów, ul. Siemianowicka 64

Insurgent memorial zone at the Mysłowice mine site

Revitalised

Mysłowice, ul. Bytomska 24

The wooden church of All Saints in Bojszowy

Wooden Architecture Route

Bojszów, ul. Kościelna 2

Mining and Metallurgy Tradition Park

Revitalised

Siemianowice Śląskie, ul. Elizy Orzeszkowej 12

Grabie Workers’ Colony

Company-sponsored Architecture

Siemianowice Śląskie, ul. Hutnicza, a także w rejonie ulic: Szkolnej, M. Kasprzaka, Jedności i Trafalczyka

Historic Silver Mine

Industry of the Past

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Repecka

Black Trout Adit

Industry of the Past

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Szczęść Boże 81

Open-air museum of Steam Engines (part of the Historic Silver Mine)

Water and Rail Infrastructure

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Szczęść Boże 79H

Riveted Grodziec Water Tower

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Będzin, ul. Willowa

The ruins of the “Saturn” cement works

Non-Revitalised

Będzin, ul. Barlickiego

Gallows frame of the Poland Coal Mine

Revitalised

Świętochłowice, ul. Wojska Polskiego 16

Housing Estate – III Workers’ Colony

Company-sponsored Architecture

Knurów, ul. Dworcowa, Mickiewicza, Damrota, Janty, Kopernika, Kościuszki, Miarki, Poniatowskiego, Sienkiewicza, Ogrodowej i Słoniny

“Elektrownia” Contemporary Art Gallery

Revitalised

Czeladź, ul. Dehnelów 45

The Piaski Housing Estate

Company-sponsored Architecture

Czeladź, ul. Francuska 13/5

Energy Museum

Industry of the Past

Łaziska Górne, ul. Wyzwolenia 30

The wooden church of St Michael the Archangel in Żernica

Wooden Architecture Route

Żernica, ul. Leopolda Miki 3

Śluza Dzierżno – Kanał Gliwicki

Water and Rail Infrastructure

Pyskowice, ul. Śluza

Open-air railway museum

Water and Rail Infrastructure

Pyskowice, ul. Piaskowa 1

The wooden church of St Nicholas in Wilcza

Wooden Architecture Route

Wilcza, ul. Karola Miarki 133

Zawada-Karchowice Water Supply Network Station

Water and Rail Infrastructure

Karchowice , ul. Bytomska 6

The wooden church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Gliwice

Wooden Architecture Route

Gliwice, ul. Kozielska 29

Workers’ housing estate of Hugo and Planty Park

Company-sponsored Architecture

Radzionków, ul. Kużaja

Workers’ housing estate of Hugo and Planty Park

Revitalised

Radzionków, ul. Kużaja

Centre of Documentation of Upper Silesians Deportation to the USSR in 1945

Revitalised

Radzionków, św. Wojciecha 118

Rudziniec lock – Gliwice Canal

Water and Rail Infrastructure

Rudziniec, ul. Dębowa 1

Parachute tower in Kościuszko Park

Heritage and Historic Sites

Katowice, ul. Tadeusza Kościuszki

Skyscraper

Modernism

Katowice, ul. Żwirki i Wigury 15

The wooden church of St Michael the Archangel in Katowice

Temples

Katowice, ul. Kościuszki 112

Silesian Library Education House

Modernism

Katowice, ul. Francuska 12

St. Kazimierz garrison church

Modernism

Katowice, ul. Mikołaja Kopernika 10

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King

Temples

Katowice, ul. Plebiscytowa 49A

Millennium Housing Estate

Urban Design

Katowice, ul. Zawiszy Czarnego

Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Dawn of Freedom

Temples

Katowice, ul. Gawronów 20

Jewish cemetery in Katowice

Jewish Culture

Katowice, ul. Kozielska 16

Silesian Insurgents’ Monument

Sculptures and Monuments

Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego

Church of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross and Our Lady of the Healing of the Sick

Temples

Katowice, ul. Mieszka I 6

St. Kazimierz garrison church

Temples

Katowice, ul. Mikołaja Kopernika 10

The wooden church of St George in Gliwice-Ostropa

Wooden Architecture Route

Gliwice, ul. Piekarska 13

The Three Emperors’ Corner

Heritage and Historic Sites

Sosnowiec, ul. Szlak Dawnego Pogranicza / Mysłowice

Schön palace and park

Villas, palaces, structures

Sosnowiec, ul. Chemiczna

Sielecki Castle

Villas, palaces, structures

Sosnowiec, ul. Zamkowa 2

Villas, palaces, structures

Sosnowiec, ul. Żeromskiego 2a

Mieroszewski Manor House

Villas, palaces, structures

Sosnowiec, ul. Dworska / ul. Szpitalna 1

Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Temples

Sosnowiec, ul. Kościelna 1

Faith, Hope and Love and Their Mother Sophia Orthodox Church

Temples

Sosnowiec, ul. Jana Kilińskiego 39

St John’s Church (church of the Evangelical Augsburg Parish in Sosnowiec)

Temples

Sosnowiec, ul. S. Żeromskiego 4

Jewish cemetery in Sosnowiec

Jewish Culture

Sosnowiec, ul. Pastewna

Radio station

Heritage and Historic Sites

Gliwice, ul. Tarnogórska 127-129-131

Willa Caro – Gliwice Museum

Heritage and Historic Sites

Gliwice, ul. Dolnych Wałów 8a

Ruins of the Victoria Theatre

Heritage and Historic Sites

Gliwice, al. Przyjaźni 18

Piast Castle

Middle Ages and Renaissance

Gliwice, ul. Pod Murami 2

Former Central Post Office building

Heritage and Historic Sites

Gliwice, ul. Dolnych Wałów 8

Holy Trinity Armenian Rite Church

Temples

Gliwice, ul. Mikołowska 8

Saints Peter and Paul Cathedral

Temples

Gliwice, ul. Jana Pawła II 5

Weichmann’s Textile House

Modernism

Gliwice, ul. Zwycięstwa 37

Former Eichendorff High School

Modernism

Gliwice, ul. Konarskiego 18

Old Jewish Cemetery “Na Piasku” in Gliwice

Jewish Culture

Gliwice, ul. Na Piasku 9

New Jewish cemetery in Gliwice

Jewish Culture

Gliwice, ul. Poniatowskiego 23

Upper Silesian Jews House of Remembrance

Jewish Culture

Gliwice, ul. Poniatowskiego 14

Hotel “Admiralspalast” in Zabrze

Modernism

Zabrze, ul. Wolności 305

St Joseph’s Church in Zabrze

Temples

Zabrze, ul. Roosevelta 102

Jewish cemetery in Zabrze

Jewish Culture

Zabrze, ul. Cmentarna 15

Museum of Steelwork

Heritage and Historic Sites

Bytom, pl. Jana III Sobieskiego 2

Tiele-Winckler Palace in Miechowice

Villas, palaces, structures

Bytom, ul. Dzierżonia 30

Gloria cinema building

Modernism

Bytom, ul. Szymanowskiego 2

St Paul’s Church in Ruda Śląska

Temples

Ruda Śląska, plac Jana Pawła II 5

Old Jewish cemetery in Bytom

Jewish Culture

Bytom, ul. Piastów Bytomskich 3

New Jewish cemetery in Bytom

Jewish Culture

Bytom, ul. Piekarska 56

Nowy Bytom sundial

Sculptures and Monuments

Ruda Śląska, ul. Niedurnego 30

Ruda Śląska combat bunkers

Military

Ruda Śląska, ul. K. Goduli 41

Brama Słońca (Sun Gate)

Contemporary

Tychy, ul. R. Dmowskiego 31-33

Housing Estate A

Urban Design

Tychy, pl. św. Anny, ul. Arkadowa, Wojska Polskiego, gen. Andersa, Asnyka

Housing Estate B

Urban Design

Tychy, pl. Baczyńskiego, ulice Brzozowa, Bohaterów Warszawy, Batorego, Braterska, Biblioteczna, Bocheńskiego, Budowlanych

Church of the Holy Spirit in Tychy-Żwaków

Temples

Tychy, ul. Myśliwska 43

Church of St Francis of Assisi and St Clare in Tychy (Little Assisi)

Temples

Tychy, ul. Paprocańska 90

Monument of Struggle and Labour – “Giraffe”

Sculptures and Monuments

Tychy, ul. Edukacji

Palace of Culture of the Zagłębie Region

Contemporary

Dąbrowa Górnicza, plac Wolności 1

Sztygarka City Museum

Heritage and Historic Sites

Dąbrowa Górnicza, ul. Legionów Polskich 69

Basilica of Our Lady of the Angels

Temples

Dąbrowa Górnicza, ul. Królowej Jadwigi 17

Main Post Office

Heritage and Historic Sites

Chorzów, ul. Pocztowa 1

Municipal Savings Bank building

Modernism

Chorzów, ul. Zjednoczenia 1

Giraffe statue in Silesian Park

Sculptures and Monuments

Chorzów, aleja Żyrafy

Combat Bunker on Katowicka Street (ul. Katowicka)

Military

Chorzów, ul. Katowicka 168

Rheinbaben Palace

Villas, palaces, structures

Siemianowice Śląskie, ul. Oświęcimska 1

Donnersmarck Palace (also known as Mieroszewski Palace)

Villas, palaces, structures

Siemianowice Śląskie, ul. Fryderyka Chopina 10

Fitzner Villa

Villas, palaces, structures

Siemianowice Śląskie, ul. Fitznerów 3

The palace and park in Rybna

Villas, palaces, structures

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Powstańców Warszawskich 90

Castle in Tarnowice Stare

Villas, palaces, structures

Tarnowskie Góry, ul. Pyskowicka 39

Palace in Nakło Śląskie

Villas, palaces, structures

Nakło Śląskie, ul. Parkowa 1

Defensive castle in Bedzin

Middle Ages and Renaissance

Będzin, ul. Zamkowa 1

Będzin Underground and Castle Hill

Heritage and Historic Sites

Będzin, ul. Górna

Mieroszewski Palace

Villas, palaces, structures

Będzin, ul. Gzichowska 15

“Mizrachi” Prayer House

Jewish Culture

Będzin, ul. Ignacego Potockiego 3

New Jewish cemetery in Będzin

Jewish Culture

Będzin, ul. Podzamcze 8

Mound of Liberation

Heritage and Historic Sites

Piekary Śląskie, ul. Do Kopca Wyzwolenia 2

Sanctuary of the Mother of Justice and Social Love in Piekary Śląskie

Temples

Piekary Śląskie, ul. Ks. Ficka 7

Fortifications of the Śląsk Fortified Area

Military

Piekary Śląskie, ul. Długosza 84

Museum of the Silesian Uprisings

Heritage and Historic Sites

Świętochłowice, ul. Wiktora Polaka 1

“Zgoda” concentration camp

Heritage and Historic Sites

Świętochłowice, ul. Wojska Polskiego 121

Nad Jamną Estate

Urban Design

Mikołów, ul. Ludwika Waryńskiego 22-40

Jewish cemetery in Mikołów

Jewish Culture

Mikołów, ul. Stara Droga

Cavalier Palace

Villas, palaces, structures

Świerklaniec, ul. Parkowa 30

Szałsza Palace

Villas, palaces, structures

Szałsza, ul. Ziemiecicka 6

Palace in Sośnicowice

Villas, palaces, structures

Sośnicowice, ul. Kozielska 1

The palace and park in Przyszowice

Villas, palaces, structures

Przyszowice, ul. Parkowa 11

Hunting lodge complex in Promnice

Villas, palaces, structures

Promnice, al. Książęca

The palace and park in Pławniowice

Villas, palaces, structures

Pławniowice, ul. Gliwicka 46

Cavalier House in Pławniowice

Villas, palaces, structures

Pławniowice, ul. Gliwicka 50

Palace in Kamieniec

Villas, palaces, structures

Kamieniec, ul. Polna 2

Saturn Palace (Roman Baths)

Villas, palaces, structures

Czeladź, ul. Dehnelów 2

Jewish cemetery in Czeladź

Jewish Culture

Czeladź, ul. Będzińska 68

Jewish cemetery in Bieruń Stary

Jewish Culture

Bieruń, ul. św. Wita

Jewish cemetery in Pyskowice

Jewish Culture

Pyskowice, ul. Zaolszany 12

St. Clement’s Church

Temples

Lędziny, ul. Zabytkowa

Combat bunkers of the Upper Silesian Position

Military

Zbrosławice, ul. Pogodna 1

Church and mausoleum of the Donnersmarck family in Świerklaniec

Temples

Świerklaniec, ul. Parkowa 30

Wooden inn

Middle Ages and Renaissance

Sławków, ul. Rynek 2

Castle ruins

Middle Ages and Renaissance

Siewierz, ul. Tadeusza Kościuszki 5

Chudów Castle

Middle Ages and Renaissance

Chudów, ul. Podzamcze 6

Combat Bunker No. 52 “Wesoła”

Military

Dobieszowice, ul. Wesoła

The “Sowiniec” Combat Bunker in Gostynia

Military

Gostyń, ul. Tęczowa

St Barbara’s Church

Temples

Ożarowice, ul. Tarnogórska 35A

Former synagogue

Jewish Culture

Sławków, ul. Biskupia 10

Ruins of the castle of the bishops of Krakow

Middle Ages and Renaissance

Sławków, ul. Staropocztowa

St. Mark’s Church in Slavkov

Temples

Sławków, ul. Świętojańska 33

Municipal Palm House

Palm House and Botanical Gardens

Gliwice, ul. Aleksandra Fredry 6

Botanical and Zoological Garden – Exotarium

Palm House and Botanical Gardens

Sosnowiec, ul. Marszałka Józefa Piłsudskiego 116

Municipal Botanical Garden

Palm House and Botanical Gardens

Zabrze, ul. Piłsudskiego 60

Planetarium – Silesian Science Park

Planetarium

Chorzów, al. Planetarium 4

The wooden parsonic granary in Przyszowice

Wooden Architecture Route

Przyszowice, ul. Powstańców Śląskich 1

Silesian Botanical Garden in Mikolow

Palm House and Botanical Gardens

Mikołów, ul. Sosnowa 5

AQUADROM – Water Park

Water Parks

Ruda Śląska, ul. Kłodnicka 95

Site of the former Orzegów Coking Plant

Walking and Recreation

Ruda Śląska, ul. Kard. Augusta Hlonda 52

Paprocany

Beaches and Bodies of Water

Tychy, ul. Parkowa

Silesian Park

Walking and Recreation

Chorzów, ul. Różana 2

Gallows frame of the Poland Coal Mine

Walking and Recreation

Świętochłowice, ul. Wojska Polskiego 16

Przeczyce Reservoir

Beaches and Bodies of Water

Przeczyce, ul. Słoneczna

Dziećkowice

Beaches and Bodies of Water

Imielin, ul. Maratońska / Chełm Śląski ul. Gamrot

Prezydent shaft, Sztygarka complex

Mine Shafts and Water Towers

Chorzów, ul. Piotra Skargi 34 a/d

The wooden church of St Lawrence in Chorzów

Wooden Architecture Route

Chorzów, ul. Marii Konopnickiej 29

Spodek Sports And Entertainment Arena
Contemporary
Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 35
Website Directions
Tak
Admission is free
Description:

Spodek, a symbol and icon of Katowice, was opened in 1971. At the time, it was the largest and most modern sports and entertainment facility in Poland. Construction of the entire complex began in 1964 but was interrupted for 1.5 years due to concerns about structural flaws (which were not confirmed). The facility received its customary name “Spodek,” which means “saucer” in Polish, from the local residents who thought that its shape resembled a UFO.

Spodek hosted numerous prestigious cultural events (such as performances by Elton John and Tina Turner) and other significant happenings (including a 6-hour speech by Fidel Castro and the premiere of the Fiat 126p). It was also used for film screenings (with the experience enhanced by a massive screen).

In addition to the main sports and entertainment arena, Spodek complex includes an ice rink, a gymnasium, and a hotel with a restaurant. Today, it is part of the Katowice Cultural Zone, situated near other Katowice landmarks such as the International Congress Centre (MCK), the National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR), and the Silesian Museum.

Interesting Facts:

The idea of building a sports and entertainment hall in Katowice (then known as Stalinogród) emerged as early as 1955. Initially, the Provincial Park of Culture and Recreation (Polish: Wojewódzki Park Kultury i Wypoczynku) was considered as the location. In 1959, the Association of Polish Architects (SARP) announced a design competition for the project, and the winning design was submitted by a team of architects from the Office for Standard Industrial Building Studies and Projects (Biuro Studiów i Projektów Typowych Budownictwa Przemysłowego) in Warsaw, led by Maciej Gintowt and Maciej Krasiński (the structural engineer, Andrzej Żórawski, designed a roof suspended in a manner similar to the one in the Warsaw Supersam shopping centre). Following the presentation of the project and with the support of the then-Governor and General Jerzy Ziętek, the location was determined near the city centre, on the site of a former steel-mill slag heap and mining-damaged areas.

In 2009, Spodek underwent a comprehensive renovation while preserving its original character. The seating capacity for spectators was increased by 2,500 (now accommodating over 11,000 people).

For the first time in Europe for civilian purposes, the American military “Praetorian” monitoring system was implemented there (in addition to standard video transmission, it integrates information from multiple cameras on one screen).

Spodek Sports And Entertainment Arena
Entertainment and Sports Arenas and Stadiums
Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 35
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

Spodek, a symbol and icon of Katowice, was opened in 1971. At the time, it was the largest and most modern sports and entertainment facility in Poland. Construction of the entire complex began in 1964 but was interrupted for 1.5 years due to concerns about structural flaws (which were not confirmed). The facility received its customary name “Spodek,” which means “saucer” in Polish, from the local residents who thought that its shape resembled a UFO.

Spodek hosted numerous prestigious cultural events (such as performances by Elton John and Tina Turner) and other significant happenings (including a 6-hour speech by Fidel Castro and the premiere of the Fiat 126p). It was also used for film screenings (with the experience enhanced by a massive screen).

In addition to the main sports and entertainment arena, Spodek complex includes an ice rink, a gymnasium, and a hotel with a restaurant. Today, it is part of the Katowice Cultural Zone, situated near other Katowice landmarks such as the International Congress Centre (MCK), the National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR), and the Silesian Museum.

Interesting Facts:

The idea of building a sports and entertainment hall in Katowice (then known as Stalinogród) emerged as early as 1955. Initially, the Provincial Park of Culture and Recreation (Polish: Wojewódzki Park Kultury i Wypoczynku) was considered as the location. In 1959, the Association of Polish Architects (SARP) announced a design competition for the project, and the winning design was submitted by a team of architects from the Office for Standard Industrial Building Studies and Projects (Biuro Studiów i Projektów Typowych Budownictwa Przemysłowego) in Warsaw, led by Maciej Gintowt and Maciej Krasiński (the structural engineer, Andrzej Żórawski, designed a roof suspended in a manner similar to the one in the Warsaw Supersam shopping centre). Following the presentation of the project and with the support of the then-Governor and General Jerzy Ziętek, the location was determined near the city centre, on the site of a former steel-mill slag heap and mining-damaged areas.

In 2009, Spodek underwent a comprehensive renovation while preserving its original character. The seating capacity for spectators was increased by 2,500 (now accommodating over 11,000 people).

For the first time in Europe for civilian purposes, the American military “Praetorian” monitoring system was implemented there (in addition to standard video transmission, it integrates information from multiple cameras on one screen).

The Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR),
Contemporary
Katowice, plac Wojciecha Kilara 1
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

The headquarters of the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR) is one of the most modern music venues in Poland and Europe, built according to the design of the Tomasz Konior architectural studio. Construction began in 2012 and the inaugural concert took place in late 2014 (featuring Krystian Zimerman and the London Symphonic Orchestra, among others).

The façade of the NOSPR draws on the historical buildings of Silesia through brick pillars, plain and bright red recesses, like the windows of the familok of the Nikiszowiec mining residental estate. The interior of the building is very modern, but using natural materials: concrete, marble, wood.

It is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other iconic buildings of Katowice are located in the neighbourhood: Spodek, MCK, Silesian Museum).

Interesting facts:

The centrepiece of the building is a monumental block of coloured concrete with a 1,800-seat concert hall, an auditorium (with an area of more than 250 m2) for an orchestra of more than 120 musicians and a choir of 100 singers. In addition, the building contains approximately 400 rooms for employees. The acoustics of the NOSPR hall were supervised by a master of his craft – Yasuhisa Toyota of Nagata Acoustics, whose portfolio includes projects for the world’s best concert halls.

Silesian Museum
Contemporary
Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

The museum was established in 2015 on the site of the disused coal mine Katowice (formerly Ferdynand). The building is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other icons of Katowice are located in the vicinity: Spodek, NOSPR, MCK).

The architectural concept draws on the industrial history of Silesia and the original function of the site on which it stands – which is why most of the building is underground, while on the surface there are only glazed blocks and restored historical buildings (mainly from the 19th century). The attraction is the 40 m high hoist tower of the Warsaw II shaft, to which a panoramic lift has been added, allowing visitors to reach the upper platform from where there is a view of the entire city. The building has received numerous awards.

Interesting facts:

The Silesian Museum was established by a resolution of the Silesian Parliament in 1929 and operated until the outbreak of World War II. The first permanent premises were erected in 1939. It was one of the most modern exhibition facilities in Europe in the modernist style. Unfortunately, it never functioned – shortly after the outbreak of World War II, it was demolished by the Germans (the exhibits were saved by being stored in the warehouses of the Upper Silesian Museum in Bytom, although some of the collections were destroyed and dispersed as a result of frontline combat, the Soviet war commissioner’s administration and looters). For 33 years, the Museum was housed in the former Grand Hotel on the Market Square in Katowice (built in 1984, designed by the architect Ignatz Gruenfeld).

Awards and honourable mentions:

Grand Prix Award 2014 of the Association of Architects of the Republic of Poland in the Architecture of the Year competition and the Grand Prix award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2015 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2018 in the competition for the Best Public Space (“Revitalisation of the historic buildings of the Main Bath and the Carpentry Shop together with the adjacent area of the former Katowice mine and construction of the necessary infrastructure for the Silesian Museum in Katowice”).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Nikiszowiec Housing Estate
Company-sponsored Architecture
Katowice, os. Nikiszowiec (ul. św. Anny)
Directions
Tak
Admission is free
Description:

A workers’ housing estate for the miners of the Giesche Coal Mine, built between 1908 and 1918, on the initiative of the Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben/Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs), designed by Berlin architects Emil and Georg Zillmann. It was constructed when there was no more space left in the Giszowiec estate. It was built on a 20-hectare area, intended to house around 5,000 workers and officials. Nine three-storey buildings were erected, forming quadrangles with inner courtyards (previously, this area housed pigsties, storage rooms, and bread ovens), connected by batten plates. The architectural details are diverse and adorn all the buildings. The entire estate forms a compact, block-like urban development with a central point, Liberation Square [Plac Wyzwolenia], a monumental St. Anne’s Church, and contemporary service buildings such as shops (known as “konzumy”), a restaurant, a police station, a school, a laundry with a drying room, and a bathhouse. Within the estate, there are two charming and stylish places, each with a different atmosphere. The first is a bakery with a long-standing tradition and a developed gastronomic and confectionery section, with an interior reminiscent of an old kitchen with “antique” furniture and a “byfyj” (buffet), located in charming arcades by the market square. The second place is the “Prohibicja” restaurant, somewhat industrial but also retro in style, located in one of familoks [familok – a multi-family house built for coalminers], where the menu combines tradition with modernity.

Interesting Facts:

The name of the estate comes from the name of the Nickischschacht (later Poniatowski) mine shaft from the early 20th century, which commemorated Baron Nickisch von Rosenegk (a member of the supervisory board of the then owner of these areas, the Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern [Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben/Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs]). Today, Nikiszowiec is becoming increasingly popular, both for permanent living and for tourism. Its undeniable advantage is the preserved urban layout that reflects the atmosphere of the time when the estate was created. The architecture is listed on the Registry of Cultural Property, and in 2011, it was declared a historical monument (by Presidential Decree).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

See also:

In the Nikiszowiec buildings, the Museum of Katowice History has created an interesting exhibition on what may seem like a mundane topic: soap and laundry – it is available in a virtual version at: https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=bisibUnfTk6

Valley of Three Ponds (Katowice Forest Park)
Walking and Recreation
Katowice, ul. Trzech Stawów
Directions
Tak
Admission is free
Culture Zone
Revitalised
Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego / pl. Sławika i Antala
Website Directions
Tak
Admission is free
Description:

The Culture Zone in Katowice is located in the immediate vicinity of Katowice’s symbol – the Spodek arena, and encompasses three high-class architectural marvels, repeatedly awarded in competitions: the International Congress Centre (MCK), the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR), and the Silesian Museum.

Interesting Facts:

The Culture Zone was established in the heart of the city, mostly on the grounds of the former Katowice mine (formerly known as Ferdynand), which operated from the early 19th century until the 1990s (among its founders were Stanisław Mieroszewski and Ignacy Ferdynand von Beym). Thanks to revitalisation efforts, this space has been reclaimed for the residents. The area gained new functions, becoming a meeting place for locals, a major tourist attraction, and above all, a venue for important cultural and business events. The total value of investment projects, including the reconstruction of road infrastructure, exceeds one billion Polish złoty. Their implementation was made possible thanks to the support of European funds.

Silesian Museum
Revitalised
Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

The museum was established in 2015 on the site of the disused coal mine Katowice (formerly Ferdynand). The building is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other icons of Katowice are located in the vicinity: Spodek, NOSPR, MCK).

The architectural concept draws on the industrial history of Silesia and the original function of the site on which it stands – which is why most of the building is underground, while on the surface there are only glazed blocks and restored historical buildings (mainly from the 19th century). The attraction is the 40 m high hoist tower of the Warsaw II shaft, to which a panoramic lift has been added, allowing visitors to reach the upper platform from where there is a view of the entire city. The building has received numerous awards.

Interesting facts:

The Silesian Museum was established by a resolution of the Silesian Parliament in 1929 and operated until the outbreak of World War II. The first permanent premises were erected in 1939. It was one of the most modern exhibition facilities in Europe in the modernist style. Unfortunately, it never functioned – shortly after the outbreak of World War II, it was demolished by the Germans (the exhibits were saved by being stored in the warehouses of the Upper Silesian Museum in Bytom, although some of the collections were destroyed and dispersed as a result of frontline combat, the Soviet war commissioner’s administration and looters). For 33 years, the Museum was housed in the former Grand Hotel on the Market Square in Katowice (built in 1984, designed by the architect Ignatz Gruenfeld).

Awards and honourable mentions:

Grand Prix Award 2014 of the Association of Architects of the Republic of Poland in the Architecture of the Year competition and the Grand Prix award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2015 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2018 in the competition for the Best Public Space (“Revitalisation of the historic buildings of the Main Bath and the Carpentry Shop together with the adjacent area of the former Katowice mine and construction of the necessary infrastructure for the Silesian Museum in Katowice”).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Silesian Freedom and Solidarity Centre and the Monument to the Wujek Nine
Revitalised
Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

A museum set up in a historic building, more than 100 years old, which is part of the Wujek mine. Before World War II, it was used as a place for filling miners’ lamps with carbide and later as a warehouse for working clothes. Yet, the Museum is so much more than just an exhibition — it is a witness to history, the site of the tragic events of 16 December 1981, when shots were fired from the building’s ramp, killing nine miners of the Wujek Mine. This creates a truly solemn atmosphere. One undeniable advantage of the Museum is the possibility to arrange visits accompanied by witnesses of those events.

Interesting facts:

The new main exhibition opened on the 40th anniversary of the Pacification of the Wujek Mine. The exhibition is primarily devoted to the December 1981 strike at the Wujek Mine and Polish resistance to the communist system in the 1980s.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2022 (co-winner), in the competition for the Best Public Space.

The Monument to the Wujek Nine
Sculptures and Monuments
Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The monument designed by Alina Borowczak-Grzybowska and Andrzej Grzybowski consists of a 33-meter high cross. Next to the main cross, on the right side, in the plinth, there are urns with soil from the graves of nine miners – victims of pacification, placed in nine crosses. The facility is included in the register of memorial sites in the Silesian Voivodeship.

Culture Zone
Contemporary
Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego / pl. Sławika i Antala
Website Directions
Tak
Admission is free
Description:

The Culture Zone in Katowice is located in the immediate vicinity of Katowice’s symbol – the Spodek arena, and encompasses three high-class architectural marvels, repeatedly awarded in competitions: the International Congress Centre (MCK), the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR), and the Silesian Museum.

Interesting Facts:

The Culture Zone was established in the heart of the city, mostly on the grounds of the former Katowice mine (formerly known as Ferdynand), which operated from the early 19th century until the 1990s (among its founders were Stanisław Mieroszewski and Ignacy Ferdynand von Beym). Thanks to revitalisation efforts, this space has been reclaimed for the residents. The area gained new functions, becoming a meeting place for locals, a major tourist attraction, and above all, a venue for important cultural and business events. The total value of investment projects, including the reconstruction of road infrastructure, exceeds one billion Polish złoty. Their implementation was made possible thanks to the support of European funds.

Fabryka Porcelany
Revitalised
Katowice, ul. Porcelanowa 23
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The Porcelain Factory, otherwise known as the “Park” Porcelana Śląska Industrial and Technological Park, is located at ul. Porcelanowa 23 in Katowice, on a former industrial site. The Porcelain Factory is a unique complex of buildings dating from the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. At that time it served as a feed factory, which was rebuilt as the “Giesche Porcelain” factory in 1923-1925. In 1952, the name of plants and the factory sign were changed to “Bogucice”. Today, the Factory Space is a venue for meetings, concerts and interesting cultural events. It also contains the Bogucice porcelain showroom, as well as a gallery and factory that produces collector and commemorative porcelain series. Revitalisation works of the former porcelain factory began on the initiative of the Giesche Foundation. In addition, the facility is the most multifunctional location in the region, as companies from the creative and IT industries are mainly based here. On its premises, you can find fashion designer boutiques, interior decor shops, restaurants, a music club, a fitness club, medical outpatient clinics, and a creative zone for children called “Bajka Pana Kleksa.”

Interesting facts:

As part of the Porcelain Factory complex, which is registered as a whole in the Municipal Heritage Inventory, there are highly valuable examples of postindustrial architecture, including the old kiln buildings, paint studios, and pattern rooms that served for nearly 100 years in porcelain production. Additionally, characteristic features of the Upper Silesian landscape include a water tower and a chimney.

Old Railway Station
Revitalised
Katowice, ul. Dworcowa
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The Old Railway Station complex was built in 1906 in the style of historical modernism. It was rebuilt several times in later years. It was the most important railway facility of Upper Silesia. After World War II, the building proved to be too small and decisions were made to build a new railway station, which was put into operation in 1972, at which time the old railway station fell into disuse. The complex has been undergoing renovation since 2016 and used as a service facility.

Additional information:

The complex is listed as a technical monument.

Wilson Shaft Gallery
Revitalised
Katowice, ul. Oswobodzenia 1
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The shaft is the largest private art gallery in Poland, with an exhibition area of more than 2,500 m². It is located in the Wilson Shaft building (formerly Richthofen and Hulda), designed by Berlin architects, cousins Emil and Georg Zillmann.

The gallery was opened in 2001 in the revitalised pithead building and bathhouse of the Wilson shaft of the Wieczorek hard coal mine. The gallery is a combination of the post-industrial past and the present.

The gallery is associated with the so-called Janowska Group (official name: Group of Non-Professional Painters); i.e. amateur painters, coming from a working-class environment, usually miners. It is a cultural phenomenon; the history of the group dates back to the 1930s; it was founded by Teofil Ociepka who was fascinated by occultism (he was considered, next to Krynica’s Nikifor, to be the most famous Polish “primitivist”).  After World War II, artists gathered at the company cultural centre at the “Wieczorek” hard coal mine, founded by Otto Klimczok. The gallery has its own unique collection of contemporary art, including the old Janowska Group and contemporary naive artists. One of the most important cyclical events is the Art Naif Festival, presenting works by naive artists from around the world. The gallery is also sometimes made available for holding concerts, festivals, balls, performances, conferences, and is also a venue for shooting films, music videos, artistic photo sessions, fashion shows, etc.

Interesting Facts:

The name of the shaft, given in 1935, comes from the surname of the President of the United States. After the war, the shaft belonged to the Wieczorek Coal Mine. In 1995, the shaft was closed, and in 1998, the process of adapting it into a contemporary art gallery by a private entity began.

The shaft is used to access deposits and provide ventilation to mines. It often consists of several buildings, with the most characteristic and visible on the surface being the gallows frame (headframe and outset). There are various types of shafts. Due to their different functions, there are skip shafts (for removing ore), ventilation shafts (downcast and upcast), dumping shafts, materials transport shafts, and personnel transport shafts. Based on their location, shafts can be categorised as main shafts (in the central part of the mining area) and peripheral/escape shafts (located at the boundaries of the mining area). The components of a shaft include the headframe, the shaft pipe (the section between the headframe and the sump, divided into compartments with different purposes), the shaft bottom (on subsequent levels of the mine, directly adjacent to the shaft); the sump (the lower part of the shaft, below the deepest mining level).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Mokrski Brewery
Revitalised
Katowice, ul. ks. bpa Bednorza 2a-6
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The brewery was built by the Mokrski brothers in the second half of the 19th century. It produced beer and malt until the First World War, then was used as a storage facility. In 1991, it has been revitalised by a private investor, and its buildings now serve as offices and warehouses.

Pułaski Shaft and Wieczorek Mine buildings
Mine Shafts and Water Towers
Katowice, ul. Szopienicka
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The buildings of the Pułaski Shaft (Carmer) from 1903-1911, in an eclectic style with a predominance of Art Nouveau and historicist elements, designed by Berlin architects: cousins Emil and Georg Zillmann, are a remnant of the Wieczorek (formerly Gische) mine. On the former mine site, you can find:

  • pithead building and bathhouse: a single-storey brick building in the shape of an elongated rectangle with a gable roof and a distinctive clock tower. The facade features glazed green bricks with rich decorative elements such as flat pilaster strips (flat vertical projections on the facade), brick friezes (horizontal elements of the cornice), arches, and beams. In the interior, the original equipment is partially preserved;
  • headframe with a hoist tower: a three-story building with a steel frame filled with bricks, roughly square in shape, with a gable roof. At the centre of the headframe stands a steel gallows frame, 40 metres in height, equipped with a double four-post headframe with inclined braces (for transporting people and skips (i.e. large containers or buckets for hauling ore, with an automatic loading and unloading device). The shaft, dating back to 1910, reaches a depth of 450 m;
  • sorting station: a three-story building with a steel frame filled with bricks, with a layout similar to a rectangle, featuring a gable roof. The historic interior equipment has been preserved.
  • engine room and converter building: 1-storey brick buildings (the former on a rectangular plan, the latter trapezoidal). The interior houses preserved Siemens coal haulage machines from 1906.
  • smithy and mechanical workshop: a 1-storey brick building in the shape of an elongated rectangle, with a mansard roof (on the west side) and a pulpit roof (on the east side). The facade includes decorative bands, friezes, flat pilaster strips (…), and glazed bricks. In the interior, the original equipment is partially preserved;
  • carpentry shop: a 1-storey brick building in the shape of a rectangle, with a gable roof;

The former mine site is currently being transformed into the District of New Technologies – Gaming and Technology HUB which will bring together entrepreneurs from the e-sports and computer gaming industry, as well as technology companies.

Interesting Facts:

The Wieczorek mine (formerly Giesche; named Janów  in 1945-1946) was founded at the end of the 19th century (1883) as a result of the acquisition of mines and mining fields by the Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben/Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs), which had been buying up mines and mining fields since the 1830s. In total, 11 mines were acquired (Abendroth, Agnes Amanda, Edwin, Elfriede, Giesche, Guter Albert, Auguste, Morgenroth, Teichmannshoffnung, Vitus, Wildsteinssegen).

The mine includes the double Pułaski (Carmer) mining shaft, dating from 1903-1910, with a depth of 450 metres, and the Poniatowski (Nickisch) ventilation and personnel transport shaft, from 1904-1911, with a depth of 400 m.  Nearby, workers’ housing estates were built, starting with Giszowiec (rural-style houses) and later Nikiszowiec (familoks – multifamily houses built for coalminers), designed by Berlin architects Emil and Georg Zillmann, who were cousins.

The Polish word for pithead building, i.e. “cechownia”, is a Polonised version of the German term Zechenhaus, meaning “mine house”, i.e. an assembly room/place for miners to gather before and after work and to pray in front of an altar or statue of Saint Barbara (the patron saint of miners); while “zeche” is one of several words for “mine”.

International Congress Centre (MCK)
Contemporary
Katowice, plac Sławika i Antalla 1
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

One of the largest congress centres in Poland, commissioned in 2015. It can accommodate 15,000 users at a time, with 12,000 inside the multipurpose hall itself. There are 35 conference rooms of varying sizes. The facility combines congress, conference, exhibition, trade and entertainment functions. The concept for the MCK building was to refer to the modernist architecture of the city, to take into account the proximity of the iconic Spodek building and to create a space for leisure activities. It is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other iconic buildings of Katowice are located in the neighbourhood: Spodek, NOSPR, Silesian Museum).

Interesting facts:

The green roof of the building and the observation deck of the MCK form a “Green Valley”, connecting to the Spodek. The urban and architectural concept for the building was selected in an international competition, in which the design by Warsaw-based JEMS Architekci won first place. The building is distinguished by its post-industrial aesthetic and useful design.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Grand Prix of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2016.

Superjednostka
Contemporary
Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 16-32
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

An iconic building inspired by the famous Unité d’Habitation by Le Corbusier in Marseille. A housing machine where thousands of people live. Superjednostka is one of the largest apartment blocks in Poland. It was designed by Mieczysław Król and constructed between 1963 and 1970. The apartment block could accommodate nearly 3,000 residents, which was made possible by 762 small flats, most of which were 37m 2 in size. Within this limited space, there were two rooms, a small kitchen without windows, and a compact bathroom. Each flat was equipped with a balcony. The building stands on reinforced concrete, anthropomorphic pillars designed to give the massive structure a sense of lightness, facilitate airflow, and minimise seismic vibrations.

Interesting Facts:

The elevators stop on every third floor (ground, 2nd, 5th, 8th, 11th, 14th floors). You can only traverse the entire building on the 2nd, 8th, and 14th floors.

“Walcownia” Museum of Zinc Metallurgy
Industry of the Past
Katowice, ul. 11 Listopada 50
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The facility presents the history of the development of zinc metallurgy in Upper Silesia in a post-industrial exhibition space of more than 5,000 m2, in the halls of a former zinc rolling mill. The centre-piece of the exhibition is a unique technological line for the production of zinc sheets, consisting of equipment such as smelting furnaces, a heating furnace for zinc plates, a casting carousel, preliminary and finishing rolling mills, and sheet metal cutting shears. Additionally, the museum houses a collection of four original steam engines that were used in the past to power machinery in the rolling mill.

The museum also boasts one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of vintage Harley-Davidson and Indian motorcycles in Poland. The motorcycle models in the collection date from 1920 to 1986. These motorcycles have been meticulously restored and are in good working condition. During periodic “Machine Start-up” events, the motorcycles are started and showcased to visitors. Since 2016, visitors have had the opportunity to view a collection of over 50 antique stationary combustion engines manufactured by Jacob Peping. These engines span the entire 20th century and provide insight into the history of internal combustion engine development. The museum also houses both small workshop engines that were used to power equipment like lathes and saws, as well as powerful 12-cylinder engines capable of driving large machinery and even ships.

Interesting facts:

The late 18th and early 19th centuries saw Upper Silesia’s intensive industrialisation and urbanisation due to the local natural resources. The ensuing economic changes quickly transformed the agricultural region into one of Europe’s largest industrial centres, operating until the late 1980s and early 1990s. Mines were established in large numbers: firstly of calamine (used to make brass), then of coal; ironworks were built, and attempts were made to smelt zinc (a still little-known technology). The first successful attempts at melting zinc took place in 1792 at the glassworks in Wesoła belonging to the estate of the Pszczyna Princes (by Johann Christian Ruhberg). The importance or even the breakthrough for the history of metallurgy is evidenced by the special protection of this new technology (the author of this feat was nicknamed the “Silesian Faust”); The technology involved liquefying its volatile state while eliminating air. A muffle (i.e. a hermetically sealed chamber made of refractory materials, e.g. clay, steel, chamotte, heated from the outside), modelled on glass pots, was used to do so. Despite the great secrecy, other industrialists soon learned the details. And as early as 1837, as many as 49 plants were melting this metal in the area. Over time, four major manufacturers emerged: Prince Hohenlohe in Wełnowiec and Prince Donnersmarck in Nowa Wieś, as well as Silesian mines and zinc works in Lipiny and Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben). In Szopienice, the Wilhelmina zinc works was established in 1834. Later, further metallurgical plants were built nearby, e.g. Uthemann, Bernhardi, Walter Croneck. In the early 20th century, the Szopienice metallurgical plant produced almost 25,000 tonnes of zinc and employed more than 2,100 people).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Gallows frame of the Warsaw II shaft
Mine Shafts and Water Towers
Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The gallows frame of the Warsaw shaft, measuring about 40 m in height, is a remnant of the Katowice (formerly Ferdinand) mine, which operated from the early 19th century (1823) until the 1990s (among its founders were Stanisław Mieroszewski and Ignacy Ferdynand von Beym).

It is now an integral part of the Silesian Museum, serving as a viewpoint over the entire city.

Please make sure the gallows frame is open on the given day before visiting.

Interesting facts:

Entry to the gallows frame is only with a valid ticket to the Silesian Museum. It is mainly open during the spring and summer seasons and in good weather (visits to the gallows frame last for about 5 to 15 minutes). No more than 10 people can be on the gallows frame at any one time.

Notes:

The gallows frame is temporarily closed.

Water tower at J. Korczak Street.
Mine Shafts and Water Towers
Katowice, ul. J. Korczaka
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

Measuring 68 metres in height, the water tower, featuring Art Nouveau-Modernism style, was built between 1911 and 1912 and was designed by the Berlin architects Georg and Emil Zillmann to serve the expanding zinc plant of the Georg von Giesches Erben concern (Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs).

Interesting facts:

In 1919, the tower had 2 telescopes, allowing one to see as far as 40 km all around it. In the interwar years, there was a mine called Poland (formerly Deutschland) next to the tower. In the 1960s, it belonged to the Szopienice Coloured Metals Plant and produced lead shot.

Additional information:

The site is listed on the Registry of Cultural Property.

Jerzy (Jorg) Shaft
Mine Shafts and Water Towers
Katowice, ul. Chorzowska 107
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The Jerzy Shaft (Jorg) is a remnant of the Gottwald mine, along with buildings of boiler room and engine room, as well as various mining machinery and equipment. Nowadays, it is part of the Silesia City Centre (a commercial and entertainment complex). This area represents one of the earliest or perhaps the first revitalisation of a mining site on such a large scale.

Interesting facts:

The Kleofas mine (formerly Cleophas) was founded in 1840 and operated between 1845 and 2004; originally, it was half owned by a Silesian entrepreneur, the so-called Zinc King (Karol Godula), with another half owned by Loebl Freund (Jewish merchant and entrepreneur from Bytom, tenant of the Bogucice manor), and later by the manager of the estate of Count Andreas Maria von Renard (Karol Neumann). In 1880, Karol Godula’s heiress (Joanna Gryzik-Schaffgotsch) sold it to Georg von Giesches Erben (Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs), founded in 1860 in Wrocław (involved in coal mining, galvanising and zinc smelting in Upper Silesia). In 1887, the first water supply system in Katowice was also built, bringing water from the mines to the city. In 1974, the mine was merged with the Gottwald mine.

Additional information:

The property is under conservation protection.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodship in 2006 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Giszowiec Housing Estate
Company-sponsored Architecture
Katowice, os. Giszowiec
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

A workers’ housing estate built between 1906 and 1910 for miners from the Giesche coal mine, commissioned by the company’s director Anton Uthemann, designed by Berlin architects Emil and Georg Zillmann, who were cousins. The estate was built on a 800m x 1200m plot, it included 2-, 3-, and 4-family houses with gardens, inspired by Upper Silesian rural cottages, as well as commercial and service facilities, including a communal laundry with 32 washing stations and a bathhouse (which was a very modern solution at the time). The central point was the Square under the Linden Trees [Plac pod Lipami] and the impressive Silesian Inn [Karczmy Śląskie] building.

Interesting Facts:

The estate, located on the edge of a forest, referred to the urban concept of a garden city (originated by the English urban planner Sir Ebenezer Howard). Unfortunately, during the period of the Polish People’s Republic, approximately two-thirds of this complex were demolished in 1969 during the construction of apartment blocks.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship. Buildings are covered by conservation protection.

Krzysztof Kieślowski Film School (Faculty of Radio and Television, University of Silesia)
Contemporary
Katowice, ul. Świętego Pawła 7A
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

One of the most frequently awarded structures in the Metropolis in recent years. The existing brick structure was ingeniously incorporated into a bold new design. The minimalist facade, made of openwork ceramic fittings, blends perfectly with the old part of the building as well as the surrounding architecture. The overall design draws inspiration from both traditional Silesian architecture and pre-war modernist heritage. The building was designed by BAAS Arquitectura and Grupa 5 Architekci, who skillfully integrated it into the old 19th-century urban fabric and incorporated a section of the brick facade from a typical Silesian familok [a multi-family house built for coalminers] into its facade.

Interesting Facts:

The design concept aimed to preserve the old familok on Św. Pawła Street (ul. Św. Pawła) and integrate the new WRiTV building into the historic urban structure from the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2018 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Municipal colony of the “Wujek” mine (Oheim).
Company-sponsored Architecture
Katowice, ul. J. Poniatowskiego, B. Głowackiego, Skalna, Barbary
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

Workers’ colony located in the city centre of Katowice (within the block formed by J. Poniatowskiego, B. Głowackiego, Skalna, and Barbary streets), dating from 1915-1916 to 1920. It was constructed for the workers of the Wujek coal mine, based on the design by Berlin architect Bruno Taut (who also designed the rowhouse colony in Załęska Hałda), commissioned by the Hohenlohe Werke company (owner of the Oheim [later Wujek] mine).

The colony consists of 11 buildings with simple bodies and diverse architectural details, all inspired by early modernism. The construction of first three buildings (located at 8, 10, and 12 Barbary Street [ul. Barbary 8, 10,12]) began in 1915, followed by other buildings built in 1916 on Głowackiego Street (ul. Głowackiego) and Skalna Street (ul. Skalna). They were added to the tenements of the southern side of J. Poniatowskiego Street (ul. J. Poniatowskiego) of 1907, designed by Joseph Kutz. In later years of the 20th century, some buildings had additional stories added. The layout of the flats (their size and standard) was nearly identical to the Nikiszowiec estate (with apartments featuring enfilade rooms: kitchen and 2 rooms, with access to drying rooms, a laundry room, attic, and cellars; one toilet was shared between two flats on the landing).

Each of the houses has a different facade: sections with brick, plastered and stone finishes, some with semi-circular windows adorned with brickwork, contrasting with plastered facades and rectangular windows on the upper floors.

Inside the block, there are no outbuildings or so-called “pigsties”, which was a reference to the social housing standards of Berlin at the time. The flats were well-lit and ventilated, with inner courtyards featuring greenery, accessible through two gates.

Katowice-Kostuchna Dormitory (now the seat of the Municipal Cultural Centre “South”)
Company-sponsored Architecture
Katowice, ul. T. B. Żeleńskiego 83
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

A 1909 building that was expanded between 1913 and 1921, situated on the site of the Boże Dary workers’ colony established between 1901 and 1903 according to the garden city concept (few of its buildings remain, including a 1904 villa at 76 Tadeusza Boya-Żeleńskiego Street).

Originally intended as a home for unmarried workers (with 234 beds), it is now a multifunctional facility offering catering and housing services and serving as home to the Municipal Cultural Centre South.

Initially, its central area included a high, spacious dining hall measuring 200 m². The building’s side areas were used for dormitories and day rooms; the largest dormitory (45 m²) contained 18 beds, while the others had 14 beds each. The building has two staircases — in the west and east sections. The building’s ground floor has been redeveloped to adapt it for use as a community centre.

Symfonia Centre for Music Learning and Education
Contemporary
Katowice, ul. Zacisze 3
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The building was constructed between 2005 and 2007. It was designed by KoniorStudio. The new building is connected to the main building via a glazed atrium.  The newly built part houses, among other things, a concert hall for approximately 400 people, an education centre and libraries.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Best Public Space in the Silesian Voivodeship in 2008.

“Maize” on the Tysiąclecia Estate
Contemporary
Katowice, ul. Zawiszy Czarnego
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The housing estate consists of 5 high-rise residential buildings (three 82 m high and two 56 m high), with a shape similar to a corncob and circular balconies (hence the common name “Maize”)), from the 1980s, designed by a well-known duo of Polish architects: Henryk Buszko and Aleksander Franta. It was inspired by the twin skyscrapers of Chicago’s Marina City.

Cleophas (Kleofas) mine workers’ house
Company-sponsored Architecture
Katowice, ul. Gliwicka 204
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

A building from ca. 1907 with elements of the historicist style, commissioned by the Georg von Giesches Erben concern; ca. 1920 it was extended with a second wing; it was used as a workers’ house for miners (so called “Arbeiterheim”), but also as the seat of cultural and sports societies. After World War II, it was used as a workers’ hotel for mine workers and currently it is a retail and service building, at 204 Gliwicka Street.

Interesting facts:

At the time of its construction, it was very modern – equipped with full kitchen facilities and a large auditorium with a stage, and connected to central heating supplied from a coal-fired boiler room located at the estate bakery.

Eastern Shaft No. II, formerly Kleofas Coal Mine
Mine Shafts and Water Towers
Katowice, ul. F. Bocheńskiego 66
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The Eastern Shaft No. II (formerly Schwarzenfeld II) with its buildings (gallows frame built between 1913 and 1916, with engine room and headframe from 1913–1921) in brick historicist style is a remnant of the Kleofas mine (formerly Cleophas); it served various functions: not only ventilation but also personnel transport, materials transport and mining. The tower features a two-compartment steel structure: the 1921 east shaft reaching down to a level of 519.8 m and the west shaft (completed in 1927), with cast steel wheels measuring over 22 m in diameter (only one pair survives); it is the only such pre-war gallows frame in the Katowice area.

The Eastern Shaft No. I (demolished in the mid-20th century) was built first, followed by the Eastern Shaft No. II (now protected), located 12 m away. The mine had a total of 3 shafts: the Gottwald Mine Shaft (Katowice – Dąb), Eastern Shaft No. I, II (Katowice – Witosa and Załęże Estates) and the Ulrich Shaft (Chorzów-Batory).

Interesting facts:

The Kleofas mine (formerly Cleophas) was founded in 1840 and operated between 1845 and 2004; originally it was half owned by a Silesian entrepreneur, the so-called Zinc King (Karol Godula), with another half owned by Loebl Freund (Jewish merchant and entrepreneur from Bytom, tenant of the Bogucice manor), and later by the manager of the estate of Count Andreas Maria von Renard (Karol Neumann). In 1880, Karol Godula’s heiress (Joanna Gryzik-Schaffgotsch) sold it to Georg von Giesches Erben (Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs), founded in 1860 in Wrocław (involved in coal mining, galvanising and zinc smelting in Upper Silesia).  The year 1887 also saw the construction of Katowice’s first water supply system, bringing water from the mines to the city. In 1974, the mine was merged with the Gottwald mine.

Former zinc works
Non-Revitalised
Katowice, ul. Ks. mjra Karola Woźniaka
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The site comprises buildings from 1908 to 1912 — the remnants of the Uthemann Zinc Works (formerly Wilhelmina, dating back to 1834). It is located in what was once the village of Szopienice. It comprises a management building with a clock tower and water tower designed by Berlin architects, the cousins Emil and Georg Zillman, as well as other early 20th-century or modernist-style buildings: a zinc rolling mill hall with historical equipment (machinery and equipment), a high narrow-gauge railway on a flyover, a rolling mill complete with its equipment, a boiler house, a carpenter’s workshop and late 19th-century buildings: a mechanical workshop (a locomotive depot, a rail wagon depot and a staff building).

During the 19th century, the village of Szopienice steadily evolved into a vital zinc smelting centre; an important railway line was also laid here, enabling the transport of industrial products.

The Wilhelmina zinc smelter was built in 1834 by the Georg von Giesches Erben concern (Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs). Decades later, in its immediate vicinity, the construction of further metallurgical plants began under the supervision of general manager Anton Uthemann, resulting in the establishment of the Bernhardi, Walter Croneck and Uthemann smelters (with the latter named after Uthemann himself). At the time, the metallurgical plant covered a vast area and comprised two complexes: a zinc works and a sphalerite roasting plant; it also produced cadmium.

In the early 20th century, the Szopienice metallurgical plant produced almost 25,000 tonnes of zinc and employed more than 2,100 people. After the annexation of Upper Silesia to Poland in 1922, most of its production resources ended up on the Polish side. From 1926, the smelter was controlled by the Silesian-American Corporation, a holding company in which shares were held by US capital and the previous owners (Giesche S.A. companies). During World War II, the German owners bought back the shares held by their US counterparts. After the war, the Szopienice zinc works were nationalised and merged into one plant named Zakłady Cynkowe Szopienice (Szopienice Zinc Works), later Zakłady Hutnicze Szopienice (Szopienice Metallurgical Plant), and from 1972 — Huta Metali Nieżelaznych Szopienice (Szopienice Non-Ferrous Metals Plant). In 1998, the state enterprise began its transition into a company wholly owned by the State Treasury. In 2000, it was incorporated into the Impexmetal S.A. group of companies, and in 2008, its liquidation was commenced, a process that was eventually suspended at the request of the State Treasury.

Buildings are covered by conservation protection.

Interesting facts:

The late 18th and early 19th centuries saw Upper Silesia’s intensive industrialisation and urbanisation due to the local natural resources. The ensuing economic changes quickly transformed the agricultural region into one of Europe’s largest industrial centres, operating until the late 1980s and early 1990s. Mines were established in large numbers: firstly of calamine (used to make brass), then of coal; ironworks were built, and attempts were made to smelt zinc (a still little-known technology).

The first successful attempts at melting zinc took place in 1792 at the glassworks in Wesoła belonging to the estate of the Pszczyna Princes (by Johann Christian Ruhberg). The importance or even the breakthrough for the history of metallurgy is evidenced by the special protection of this new technology (the author of this feat was nicknamed the “Silesian Faust”); The technology involved liquefying its volatile state while eliminating air.  A muffle (i.e. a hermetically sealed chamber made of refractory materials, e.g. clay, steel, chamotte, heated from the outside), modelled on glass pots, was used to do so. Despite the great secrecy, other industrialists soon learned the details. And as early as 1837, as many as 49 plants were melting this metal in the area. Over time, four major manufacturers emerged: Prince Hohenlohe in Wełnowiec and Prince Donnersmarck in Nowa Wieś, as well as Silesian mines and zinc works in Lipiny and Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben) in Szopienice (the Wilhelmina zinc works was established there in 1834. Later, further metallurgical plants were built nearby, e.g. Uthemann, Bernhardi, Walter Croneck; at the beginning of the 20th century, the Szopienice metallurgical plant produced almost 25,000 tonnes of zinc and employed more than 2,100 people).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Pułaski Shaft and Wieczorek Mine buildings
Non-Revitalised
Katowice, ul. Szopienicka
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The buildings of the Pułaski Shaft (Carmer) from 1903-1911, in an eclectic style with a predominance of Art Nouveau and historicist elements, designed by Berlin architects: cousins Emil and Georg Zillmann, are a remnant of the Wieczorek (formerly Gische) mine. On the former mine site, you can find:

  • pithead building and bathhouse: a single-storey brick building in the shape of an elongated rectangle with a gable roof and a distinctive clock tower. The facade features glazed green bricks with rich decorative elements such as flat pilaster strips (flat vertical projections on the facade), brick friezes (horizontal elements of the cornice), arches, and beams. In the interior, the original equipment is partially preserved;
  • headframe with a hoist tower: a three-story building with a steel frame filled with bricks, roughly square in shape, with a gable roof. At the centre of the headframe stands a steel gallows frame, 40 metres in height, equipped with a double four-post headframe with inclined braces (for transporting people and skips (i.e. large containers or buckets for hauling ore, with an automatic loading and unloading device). The shaft, dating back to 1910, reaches a depth of 450 m;
  • sorting station: a three-story building with a steel frame filled with bricks, with a layout similar to a rectangle, featuring a gable roof. The historic interior equipment has been preserved.
  • engine room and converter building: 1-storey brick buildings (the former on a rectangular plan, the latter trapezoidal). The interior houses preserved Siemens coal haulage machines from 1906.
  • smithy and mechanical workshop: a 1-storey brick building in the shape of an elongated rectangle, with a mansard roof (on the west side) and a pulpit roof (on the east side). The facade includes decorative bands, friezes, flat pilaster strips (…), and glazed bricks. In the interior, the original equipment is partially preserved;
  • carpentry shop: a 1-storey brick building in the shape of a rectangle, with a gable roof;

The former mine site is currently being transformed into the District of New Technologies – Gaming and Technology HUB which will bring together entrepreneurs from the e-sports and computer gaming industry, as well as technology companies.

Interesting Facts:

The Wieczorek mine (formerly Giesche; named Janów  in 1945-1946) was founded at the end of the 19th century (1883) as a result of the acquisition of mines and mining fields by the Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben/Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs), which had been buying up mines and mining fields since the 1830s. In total, 11 mines were acquired (Abendroth, Agnes Amanda, Edwin, Elfriede, Giesche, Guter Albert, Auguste, Morgenroth, Teichmannshoffnung, Vitus, Wildsteinssegen).

The mine includes the double Pułaski (Carmer) mining shaft, dating from 1903-1910, with a depth of 450 metres, and the Poniatowski (Nickisch) ventilation and personnel transport shaft, from 1904-1911, with a depth of 400 m.  Nearby, workers’ housing estates were built, starting with Giszowiec (rural-style houses) and later Nikiszowiec (familoks – multifamily houses built for coalminers), designed by Berlin architects Emil and Georg Zillmann, who were cousins.

The Polish word for pithead building, i.e. “cechownia”, is a Polonised version of the German term Zechenhaus, meaning “mine house”, i.e. an assembly room/place for miners to gather before and after work and to pray in front of an altar or statue of Saint Barbara (the patron saint of miners); while “zeche” is one of several words for “mine”.

Company-sponsored Housing Estate of the Warsaw Society of Coal Mines and Steel Works
Company-sponsored Architecture
Sosnowiec, ul. Klubowa
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The construction of the estate began in the late 19th century after the Warsaw Society of Coal Mines and Steel Works took over mining interests in 1874. This society not only modernised the mines but also built facilities for workers of the mines. The expansion of the estate continued for many years, encompassing both residential buildings and public utility buildings such as a school, children’s shelter, community house, a hall for games and theatrical performances, library, inn with a ballroom, billiards, and reading room, bathhouse, and a home economics school for girls, as well as a hospital. The largest and most interesting structure in the complex is the inn from 1902-1903, designed in the Zakopane style (now a hotel and restaurant), created by renowned Warsaw architects – Franciszek Lillpop and Kazimierz Jankowski. This architectural style during the period of partitions was a form of patriotic expression (promoted, among others, by Stanisław Witkiewicz in the 1890s).

Interesting Facts:

The creation of this workers’ estate was linked to the accidental discovery of coal deposits in 1814 in the village of Ostrowy Górnicze (formerly known as Niemce). Sosnowiec still has dozens of different types of workers’ estates to this day, although they are in varying states of preservation.

Water tower at Leśna Street in Gliwice
Mine Shafts and Water Towers
Gliwice, ul. Leśna
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

It is one of Upper Silesia’s most beautiful water towers and the oldest in Gliwice. Constructed in 1894 in the Neo-Gothic style (backsteingotik), the tower is a brick cylinder set up on a stone plinth with a diameter of about 17.5 m. Its upper part is topped with a 2-storey decorative arcaded frieze with battlements and brick rosettes forming an attic and a flat conical roof with a spire. The tower’s architectural style hearkens back as much as possible to the medieval history of the city of Gliwice.

Interesting facts:

Today, the tower is owned by the Gliwice Water and Sewage Company (PWiK). There are plans to revitalise it and have a selected tenant establish a club café there for about 150 people. The tower is located next to the Municipal Stadium and adjacent to an early 20th-century water reservoir owned by the city.

Gwiazdy Housing Estate (Walentego Roździeński Housing Estate)
Contemporary
Katowice, al. W. Roździeńskiego 86, 88, 90, 96, 98, 100
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The estate consists of 7 apartment blocks built between 1970 and 1978 in the shape of an eight-armed star (hence the nickname “Gwiazdy,” which means “Stars” in English), designed by three well-known Polish architects: Henryk Buszko, Aleksander Franta, and Tadeusz Szewczyk.

Office buildings .KTW
Contemporary
Katowice, al. Walentego Roździeńskiego 1
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

An office complex consisting of two office buildings: .KTW I which is 66 m high, and .KTW II which is 134 m high. The first building was constructed in 2018, while the second was built in 2019. The architectural concept was developed by Przemo Łukasik and Łukasz Zagała of the Bytom-based Medusa Group. The office buildings were built on the site of a demolished skyscraper of the State Railways Directorate, right next to the Culture Zone. It was awarded a BREEAM Interim certificate of Excellent in 2018 (a multi-criteria building certification system (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method), introduced in 1990 in the UK; used in 77 countries).

Stalexport buildings – top-down construction
Contemporary
Katowice, ul. A. Mickiewicza 29
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The two buildings joined together at the base were constructed in 1981 and 1982, built using the top-down construction method. Such building are rare in Europe. The structure’s core is a reinforced concrete shaft, transferring vertical compressive loads to the building foundation. On top of it are set ceilings in the form of prestressed platforms suspended from steel cables. Cables – tensile elements are fixed to the top of the shaft and carry the weight of the ceilings onto it; they are also anchored at ground floor level to reinforce the structure.

Katowice’s unique buildings were designed by Yugoslav architect Georg Gruićić in the late 1970s. They are among the tallest buildings in Katowice, rising to 97 and 92 metres.

Scientific Information Centre and Academic Library (CINiBA)
Contemporary
Katowice, ul. Bankowa 11a
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

A shared library of two higher education institutions: the University of Economics and the University of Silesia. The CINiBA is a so-called hybrid library enabling, among other things, all types of documents to be collected and made available in parallel, regardless of their storage medium. The library was launched in 2012. It also doubles as a venue for exhibitions, cultural meetings and scientific conferences.

Silesian Freedom and Solidarity Centre and the Monument to the Wujek Nine
Heritage and Historic Sites
Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

A museum set up in a historic building, more than 100 years old, which is part of the Wujek mine. Before World War II, it was used as a place for filling miners’ lamps with carbide and later as a warehouse for working clothes. Yet, the Museum is so much more than just an exhibition — it is a witness to history, the site of the tragic events of 16 December 1981, when shots were fired from the building’s ramp, killing nine miners of the Wujek Mine. This creates a truly solemn atmosphere. One undeniable advantage of the Museum is the possibility to arrange visits accompanied by witnesses of those events.

Interesting facts:

The new main exhibition opened on the 40th anniversary of the Pacification of the Wujek Mine. The exhibition is primarily devoted to the December 1981 strike at the Wujek Mine and Polish resistance to the communist system in the 1980s.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2022 (co-winner), in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Academy of Music in Katowice
Heritage and Historic Sites
Katowice, ul. Zacisze 3
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

A historic building from the turn of the 20th century, extended between 2005 and 2007 to house the SYMFONIA Centre for Music Learning and Education. It has maintained an excellent, balanced relationship between “old and new”, i.e. contemporary elements, with extensive glazing, fit harmoniously into the historic fabric of the original building.

Interesting facts:

A neo-Gothic building constructed between 1899 and 1901, designed by Albert Weiss; it was built for the Royal School of Building Crafts (until 1922), then became the seat of the Silesian Voivodeship Office and the Silesian Parliament (until 1929), until the establishment of the State Conservatory of Music, the starting point of today’s university.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2008 in the competition for the Best Public Space in the category of modernisation.

Former home of the Silesian Museum
Heritage and Historic Sites
Katowice, ul. Korfantego 3
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The former hotel building from the turn of the 20th century, located at 3 Wojciecha Korfantego Street, was home to the Silesian Museum from December 1984. The adaptation of the four-storey building continued until 1992, when the final exhibition rooms were made available.

The Silesian Museum has a collection of over 118,000 artefacts from various fields of art, as well as archaeology, ethnography, history, photography and non-professional art.

Today, the Silesian Museum is headquartered on the premises of the former “Katowice” Coal Mine.

Spodek Sports And Entertainment Arena
Entertainment and Sports Arenas and Stadiums
Katowice, al. Wojciecha Korfantego 35
Website Directions
Tak
Admission is free
Description:

Spodek, a symbol and icon of Katowice, was opened in 1971. At the time, it was the largest and most modern sports and entertainment facility in Poland. Construction of the entire complex began in 1964 but was interrupted for 1.5 years due to concerns about structural flaws (which were not confirmed). The facility received its customary name “Spodek,” which means “saucer” in Polish, from the local residents who thought that its shape resembled a UFO.

Spodek hosted numerous prestigious cultural events (such as performances by Elton John and Tina Turner) and other significant happenings (including a 6-hour speech by Fidel Castro and the premiere of the Fiat 126p). It was also used for film screenings (with the experience enhanced by a massive screen).

In addition to the main sports and entertainment arena, Spodek complex includes an ice rink, a gymnasium, and a hotel with a restaurant. Today, it is part of the Katowice Cultural Zone, situated near other Katowice landmarks such as the International Congress Centre (MCK), the National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR), and the Silesian Museum.

Interesting Facts:

The idea of building a sports and entertainment hall in Katowice (then known as Stalinogród) emerged as early as 1955. Initially, the Provincial Park of Culture and Recreation (Polish: Wojewódzki Park Kultury i Wypoczynku) was considered as the location. In 1959, the Association of Polish Architects (SARP) announced a design competition for the project, and the winning design was submitted by a team of architects from the Office for Standard Industrial Building Studies and Projects (Biuro Studiów i Projektów Typowych Budownictwa Przemysłowego) in Warsaw, led by Maciej Gintowt and Maciej Krasiński (the structural engineer, Andrzej Żórawski, designed a roof suspended in a manner similar to the one in the Warsaw Supersam shopping centre). Following the presentation of the project and with the support of the then-Governor and General Jerzy Ziętek, the location was determined near the city centre, on the site of a former steel-mill slag heap and mining-damaged areas.

In 2009, Spodek underwent a comprehensive renovation while preserving its original character. The seating capacity for spectators was increased by 2,500 (now accommodating over 11,000 people).

For the first time in Europe for civilian purposes, the American military “Praetorian” monitoring system was implemented there (in addition to standard video transmission, it integrates information from multiple cameras on one screen).

New Gliwice
Revitalised
Gliwice, ul. Bojkowska 37
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The buildings from the early 20th century, remnants of the Gliwice coal mine (Gliwitzer Grube), include a pithead building with a monumental pressure tower, a bathhouse, and an engine room, designed by Berlin architects who were cousins, Emil and Georg Zillmann.

Currently, the engine room houses a branch of the Museum in Gliwice called the Artistic Foundry Branch (offering a multimedia exhibition showcasing artistic castings and the history of foundry work in the city).

Interesting Facts:

The Gliwice coal mine (formerly Gliwitzer Grube) traces its origins back to 1901 when 16 adjacent mining fields belonging to William Suermondt and a group of entrepreneurs from the Rhineland were merged. Construction of offices, workshops, warehouses, and workers’ quarters began, and the sinking of shafts commenced nine years later. The first operated level, at a depth of 185 metres, was opened in 1911, and operations ceased in 2000.

The Polish word for pithead building, i.e. ‘cechownia’, is a Polonised version of the German term Zechenhaus, meaning ‘mine house’, i.e. an assembly room/place for miners to gather before and after work and to pray in front of an altar or statue of Saint Barbara (the patron saint of miners); while ‘zeche’ is one of several words for ‘mine’.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Starganiec
Beaches and Bodies of Water
Mikołów, ul. Owsiana / Katowice
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

Starganiec is a former pond, which during the times of the People’s Republic of  Poland, was adapted by Baildon Smelter into a water and recreational centre for its employees. The creation of recreational centres for heavy industry workers and the inhabitants of today’s Metropolis was a constant practice of workplaces operating in the 20th century, examples of which include: Nakło-Chechło in the Tarnogórski district, the Miner’s Valley for employees of the Barbara coalmine in Chorzów, Pogoria lakes in Dąbrowa Górnicza, or Lake Paprocańskie. Following modernisation by the City of Katowice, a holiday complex was opened in 2023. It consists of a combination of fixed and floating piers, new paths and footbridges over the water at the extension of the paths. The banks were reinforced and the whole area was made free of architectural barriers so that it can be used by people with limited mobility. Small architectural elements appeared around Starganiec: arbours, benches, deckchairs, bicycle racks, as well as portable toilets, hotels for insects, nesting boxes for birds, new trees: apple trees, cherry trees, pear trees and plum trees; beach volleyball courts, a barbecue area and a small catering area (stands for food trucks). The whole area is illuminated by solar lamps and protected by municipal CCTV.

Recreation Center “Zadole”
Beaches and Bodies of Water
Katowice, ul. Wczasowa 8
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Skatepark PTG
Skateparks and Pump Tracks
Katowice, Pomnik Trudu Górniczego, ul. Górnośląska 57
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Silesian Aero Club
Aviation
Katowice, ul. Lotnisko 1
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Zagłębiowski Sports Park – ArcelorMittal Park
Entertainment and Sports Arenas and Stadiums
Sosnowiec, ul. gen. Mariusza Zaruskiego 2
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Wake Zone Stawiki
Water Sports
Sosnowiec, ul. Jana III Sobieskiego 49
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Winter Stadium
Ice Rinks
Sosnowiec, ul. Zamkowa 4
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Old Wire Factory
Non-Revitalised
Gliwice, ul. Stanisława Dubois 45c
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

A 2-storey post-production hall from the end of the 19th century, at the time part of the largest in Upper Silesia (Obereisen). The lower part serves as a concert venue and the upper part is an exhibition space. It is now a venue for cultural events – concerts, exhibitions, workshops, film screenings. The lower part of the hall is used for concerts, the upper part mainly for exhibitions. There are plans to revitalise the building.

Interesting facts:

The Obereisen concern was founded in 1887 by the German industrialist Wilhelm Hegenscheidt (a Westphalian manufacturer of innovative products such as wire cables and cold-formed nails) together with his competitor Oscar Caro, the entrepreneur from Gliwice.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Climbing Wall “Level 450”
Climbing
Sosnowiec, ul. Narutowicza 51
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Silesian Museum
Industrial Monuments Route
Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

The museum was established in 2015 on the site of the disused coal mine Katowice (formerly Ferdynand). The building is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other icons of Katowice are located in the vicinity: Spodek, NOSPR, MCK).

The architectural concept draws on the industrial history of Silesia and the original function of the site on which it stands – which is why most of the building is underground, while on the surface there are only glazed blocks and restored historical buildings (mainly from the 19th century). The attraction is the 40 m high hoist tower of the Warsaw II shaft, to which a panoramic lift has been added, allowing visitors to reach the upper platform from where there is a view of the entire city. The building has received numerous awards.

Interesting facts:

The Silesian Museum was established by a resolution of the Silesian Parliament in 1929 and operated until the outbreak of World War II. The first permanent premises were erected in 1939. It was one of the most modern exhibition facilities in Europe in the modernist style. Unfortunately, it never functioned – shortly after the outbreak of World War II, it was demolished by the Germans (the exhibits were saved by being stored in the warehouses of the Upper Silesian Museum in Bytom, although some of the collections were destroyed and dispersed as a result of frontline combat, the Soviet war commissioner’s administration and looters). For 33 years, the Museum was housed in the former Grand Hotel on the Market Square in Katowice (built in 1984, designed by the architect Ignatz Gruenfeld).

Awards and honourable mentions:

Grand Prix Award 2014 of the Association of Architects of the Republic of Poland in the Architecture of the Year competition and the Grand Prix award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2015 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2018 in the competition for the Best Public Space (“Revitalisation of the historic buildings of the Main Bath and the Carpentry Shop together with the adjacent area of the former Katowice mine and construction of the necessary infrastructure for the Silesian Museum in Katowice”).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Nikiszowiec Housing Estate
Industrial Monuments Route
Katowice, os. Nikiszowiec (ul. św. Anny)
Directions
Tak
Admission is free
Description:

A workers’ housing estate for the miners of the Giesche Coal Mine, built between 1908 and 1918, on the initiative of the Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben/Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs), designed by Berlin architects Emil and Georg Zillmann. It was constructed when there was no more space left in the Giszowiec estate. It was built on a 20-hectare area, intended to house around 5,000 workers and officials. Nine three-storey buildings were erected, forming quadrangles with inner courtyards (previously, this area housed pigsties, storage rooms, and bread ovens), connected by batten plates. The architectural details are diverse and adorn all the buildings. The entire estate forms a compact, block-like urban development with a central point, Liberation Square [Plac Wyzwolenia], a monumental St. Anne’s Church, and contemporary service buildings such as shops (known as “konzumy”), a restaurant, a police station, a school, a laundry with a drying room, and a bathhouse. Within the estate, there are two charming and stylish places, each with a different atmosphere. The first is a bakery with a long-standing tradition and a developed gastronomic and confectionery section, with an interior reminiscent of an old kitchen with “antique” furniture and a “byfyj” (buffet), located in charming arcades by the market square. The second place is the “Prohibicja” restaurant, somewhat industrial but also retro in style, located in one of familoks [familok – a multi-family house built for coalminers], where the menu combines tradition with modernity.

Interesting Facts:

The name of the estate comes from the name of the Nickischschacht (later Poniatowski) mine shaft from the early 20th century, which commemorated Baron Nickisch von Rosenegk (a member of the supervisory board of the then owner of these areas, the Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern [Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben/Mining Association of Georg von Giesche’s Heirs]). Today, Nikiszowiec is becoming increasingly popular, both for permanent living and for tourism. Its undeniable advantage is the preserved urban layout that reflects the atmosphere of the time when the estate was created. The architecture is listed on the Registry of Cultural Property, and in 2011, it was declared a historical monument (by Presidential Decree).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

See also:

In the Nikiszowiec buildings, the Museum of Katowice History has created an interesting exhibition on what may seem like a mundane topic: soap and laundry – it is available in a virtual version at: https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=bisibUnfTk6

Giszowiec Housing Estate
Industrial Monuments Route
Katowice, os. Giszowiec
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

A workers’ housing estate built between 1906 and 1910 for miners from the Giesche coal mine, commissioned by the company’s director Anton Uthemann, designed by Berlin architects Emil and Georg Zillmann, who were cousins. The estate was built on a 800m x 1200m plot, it included 2-, 3-, and 4-family houses with gardens, inspired by Upper Silesian rural cottages, as well as commercial and service facilities, including a communal laundry with 32 washing stations and a bathhouse (which was a very modern solution at the time). The central point was the Square under the Linden Trees [Plac pod Lipami] and the impressive Silesian Inn [Karczmy Śląskie] building.

Interesting Facts:

The estate, located on the edge of a forest, referred to the urban concept of a garden city (originated by the English urban planner Sir Ebenezer Howard). Unfortunately, during the period of the Polish People’s Republic, approximately two-thirds of this complex were demolished in 1969 during the construction of apartment blocks.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship. Buildings are covered by conservation protection.

“Walcownia” Museum of Zinc Metallurgy
Industrial Monuments Route
Katowice, ul. 11 Listopada 50
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The facility presents the history of the development of zinc metallurgy in Upper Silesia in a post-industrial exhibition space of more than 5,000 m2, in the halls of a former zinc rolling mill. The centre-piece of the exhibition is a unique technological line for the production of zinc sheets, consisting of equipment such as smelting furnaces, a heating furnace for zinc plates, a casting carousel, preliminary and finishing rolling mills, and sheet metal cutting shears. Additionally, the museum houses a collection of four original steam engines that were used in the past to power machinery in the rolling mill.

The museum also boasts one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of vintage Harley-Davidson and Indian motorcycles in Poland. The motorcycle models in the collection date from 1920 to 1986. These motorcycles have been meticulously restored and are in good working condition. During periodic “Machine Start-up” events, the motorcycles are started and showcased to visitors. Since 2016, visitors have had the opportunity to view a collection of over 50 antique stationary combustion engines manufactured by Jacob Peping. These engines span the entire 20th century and provide insight into the history of internal combustion engine development. The museum also houses both small workshop engines that were used to power equipment like lathes and saws, as well as powerful 12-cylinder engines capable of driving large machinery and even ships.

Interesting facts:

The late 18th and early 19th centuries saw Upper Silesia’s intensive industrialisation and urbanisation due to the local natural resources. The ensuing economic changes quickly transformed the agricultural region into one of Europe’s largest industrial centres, operating until the late 1980s and early 1990s. Mines were established in large numbers: firstly of calamine (used to make brass), then of coal; ironworks were built, and attempts were made to smelt zinc (a still little-known technology). The first successful attempts at melting zinc took place in 1792 at the glassworks in Wesoła belonging to the estate of the Pszczyna Princes (by Johann Christian Ruhberg). The importance or even the breakthrough for the history of metallurgy is evidenced by the special protection of this new technology (the author of this feat was nicknamed the “Silesian Faust”); The technology involved liquefying its volatile state while eliminating air. A muffle (i.e. a hermetically sealed chamber made of refractory materials, e.g. clay, steel, chamotte, heated from the outside), modelled on glass pots, was used to do so. Despite the great secrecy, other industrialists soon learned the details. And as early as 1837, as many as 49 plants were melting this metal in the area. Over time, four major manufacturers emerged: Prince Hohenlohe in Wełnowiec and Prince Donnersmarck in Nowa Wieś, as well as Silesian mines and zinc works in Lipiny and Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben). In Szopienice, the Wilhelmina zinc works was established in 1834. Later, further metallurgical plants were built nearby, e.g. Uthemann, Bernhardi, Walter Croneck. In the early 20th century, the Szopienice metallurgical plant produced almost 25,000 tonnes of zinc and employed more than 2,100 people).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Fabryka Porcelany
Industrial Monuments Route
Katowice, ul. Porcelanowa 23
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The Porcelain Factory, otherwise known as the “Park” Porcelana Śląska Industrial and Technological Park, is located at ul. Porcelanowa 23 in Katowice, on a former industrial site. The Porcelain Factory is a unique complex of buildings dating from the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. At that time it served as a feed factory, which was rebuilt as the “Giesche Porcelain” factory in 1923-1925. In 1952, the name of plants and the factory sign were changed to “Bogucice”. Today, the Factory Space is a venue for meetings, concerts and interesting cultural events. It also contains the Bogucice porcelain showroom, as well as a gallery and factory that produces collector and commemorative porcelain series. Revitalisation works of the former porcelain factory began on the initiative of the Giesche Foundation. In addition, the facility is the most multifunctional location in the region, as companies from the creative and IT industries are mainly based here. On its premises, you can find fashion designer boutiques, interior decor shops, restaurants, a music club, a fitness club, medical outpatient clinics, and a creative zone for children called “Bajka Pana Kleksa.”

Interesting facts:

As part of the Porcelain Factory complex, which is registered as a whole in the Municipal Heritage Inventory, there are highly valuable examples of postindustrial architecture, including the old kiln buildings, paint studios, and pattern rooms that served for nearly 100 years in porcelain production. Additionally, characteristic features of the Upper Silesian landscape include a water tower and a chimney.

Radio station
Industrial Monuments Route
Gliwice, ul. Tarnogórska 127-129-131
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

A 11-metre-high antenna tower, made of larch wood, bolted together with brass screws. To this day it is the tallest wooden structure in Europe. Its history is linked to the so-called Gliwice provocation (31 August 1939). It was an attack by a seven-person German unit disguised as Silesian insurgents on a building on Tarnogórska Street (ul. Tarnogórska), with the aim of holding Poland responsible for the outbreak of World War II and justifying its start by the Germans (as necessary defence). After the staff had been terrorised, the attackers attempted to read out in Polish a proclamation announcing the Polish offensive and calling for an uprising. Only the beginning of the proclamation was delivered, and the content  did not gain much coverage, as the actual sound equipment was elsewhere. This was confirmed in the testimony given at the Nuremberg trial by the commander of the action, Alfred Helmut Naujocks (SD security service officer and SS officer). In 2017, it was included in the list of Monuments of History, which includes objects of special tangible and intangible value for Poland’s cultural heritage. Today, the surroundings of the tower are open to visitors, and the tower itself still serves communication purposes as a mast for dozens of different antennas.

Interesting facts:

Gliwice was a border town in 1939 (the border with Poland ran beyond the turnpike). In order to spread the propaganda message about the German role of Gliwice, a transmitter station (Gleiwitzer Sender) was commissioned in 1935 on Tarnogórska Street (ul. Tarnogórska) and a vertical antenna was placed on the tower. The radio station was used for retransmission of the programme of the Breslau radio station, the Reichssender Breslau (the broadcasts could be heard on both sides of the Upper Silesian border, and at night (when the signal transmission was better) also throughout Europe, parts of Asia and even North America.

The attack on the Gliwice radio station (code-named “Tannenberg”) was part of a wider operation involving a string of border provocations – similar attacks on a German customs post in Stodoly (Hochlinden) and a forester’s lodge in Byczyna (Pitschen), and simulated attacks on German institutions and symbols in the Silesian Voivodeship, in Polish Pomerania and Greater Poland. In Katowice, SD agents planted a bomb under the printing house of the “Kattowitzer Zeitung”, the leading German daily newspaper in the Silesian Voivodeship.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2010 in the competition for the Best Public Space, in the urban planning category.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Wilson Shaft Gallery
Industrial Monuments Route
Katowice, ul. Oswobodzenia 1
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The shaft is the largest private art gallery in Poland, with an exhibition area of more than 2,500 m². It is located in the Wilson Shaft building (formerly Richthofen and Hulda), designed by Berlin architects, cousins Emil and Georg Zillmann.

The gallery was opened in 2001 in the revitalised pithead building and bathhouse of the Wilson shaft of the Wieczorek hard coal mine. The gallery is a combination of the post-industrial past and the present.

The gallery is associated with the so-called Janowska Group (official name: Group of Non-Professional Painters); i.e. amateur painters, coming from a working-class environment, usually miners. It is a cultural phenomenon; the history of the group dates back to the 1930s; it was founded by Teofil Ociepka who was fascinated by occultism (he was considered, next to Krynica’s Nikifor, to be the most famous Polish “primitivist”).  After World War II, artists gathered at the company cultural centre at the “Wieczorek” hard coal mine, founded by Otto Klimczok. The gallery has its own unique collection of contemporary art, including the old Janowska Group and contemporary naive artists. One of the most important cyclical events is the Art Naif Festival, presenting works by naive artists from around the world. The gallery is also sometimes made available for holding concerts, festivals, balls, performances, conferences, and is also a venue for shooting films, music videos, artistic photo sessions, fashion shows, etc.

Interesting Facts:

The name of the shaft, given in 1935, comes from the surname of the President of the United States. After the war, the shaft belonged to the Wieczorek Coal Mine. In 1995, the shaft was closed, and in 1998, the process of adapting it into a contemporary art gallery by a private entity began.

The shaft is used to access deposits and provide ventilation to mines. It often consists of several buildings, with the most characteristic and visible on the surface being the gallows frame (headframe and outset). There are various types of shafts. Due to their different functions, there are skip shafts (for removing ore), ventilation shafts (downcast and upcast), dumping shafts, materials transport shafts, and personnel transport shafts. Based on their location, shafts can be categorised as main shafts (in the central part of the mining area) and peripheral/escape shafts (located at the boundaries of the mining area). The components of a shaft include the headframe, the shaft pipe (the section between the headframe and the sump, divided into compartments with different purposes), the shaft bottom (on subsequent levels of the mine, directly adjacent to the shaft); the sump (the lower part of the shaft, below the deepest mining level).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Museum of Sanitary Technology
Industrial Monuments Route
Gliwice, ul. Edisona 16
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

This institution features exhibitions primarily showcasing the interiors of flats and everyday objects used in Poland from 1945 to 1989. Additionally, the museum has a Monument Park where monuments from the PRL (Polish People’s Republic) era are displayed. The outdoor exhibition also includes collections related to automotive technology from that period.

Interesting Facts:

The museum is located on the premises of the former Dwór Nowa Ruda estate, which belonged to the von Ballestrem family.

Additional Information:

The museum is operated by the Minionej Epoki Foundation and is open seasonally.

Artistic Foundry Branch of the Museum in Gliwice
Industrial Monuments Route
Gliwice, ul. Bojkowska 37
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

This branch of the Museum in Gliwice exhibits a collection of artistic bronze and iron castings and is located in the former engine room of the Gliwice mine.

Interesting Facts:

The origins of the Gliwice mine (Gliwitzer Grube) date back to 1901 (when 16 mining fields belonging to William Suermondt and several entrepreneurs from the Rhineland were merged). The mine operated from 1912 to 2000.

Additional Information:

Visiting this branch of the Museum is free for everyone on Saturdays [as of July 2023].

Queen Louise Adit
Industrial Monuments Route
Zabrze, ul. Wolności 408
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

An underground and surface mining complex open to visitors, based on one of the oldest coal mines in Upper Silesia. It stands as a true monument to the industrial history of the region while also being a unique tourist attraction in Europe. The Zabrze section, approximately 2.5 km in length, is open to tourists (the total length is over 14 km, from the outlet in the centre of Zabrze to the former Król mine in Chorzów – Krug shaft, which has been closed since 2015). The exploration of this complex begins at the Łańcuszkowa Bathhouse [Łaźnia Łańcuszkowa].

Interesting Facts:

The Main Key Hereditary Adit is an outstanding  engineering feat that reflects technological advancements in the first half of the 19th century (one of the challenges at the time was tunneling from two opposite directions while maintaining proper water flow). Its origins date back to the 18th century when coal deposits were discovered, necessitating the removal of the incoming water.  Before the advent of steam engines, water was manually drawn into barrels using winches or horse-driven whims, or pumps operated by horse-powered whims. The high costs of mine dewatering and coal transportation prompted the need for an innovative drainage and transport system.

The construction of the adit lasted 64 years (1799–1863) and was initiated by Count Friedrich Wilhelm von Reden, who observed this solution during his visit to England. It became the longest underground hydrotechnical structure associated with coal mining in Europe. It facilitated the dewatering of two state-owned mines and approximately 20 private mines, as well as provided access to deeper coal seams for extraction. It also served as part of a waterway connecting Upper Silesia with Western European ports through the Kłodnica Canal, with its starting point being the outlet of the adit.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Historic Maciej Shaft
Industrial Monuments Route
Zabrze, ul. Srebrna 6
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

Dating back to the first half of the 20th century, the Maciej Shaft features a Siemens-Schuckertwerke double-drum winding machine and is a remnant of the Concordia Mine. Other surviving parts of the facility include a complex of 7 buildings and a waste rock dump. Today, the headframe building houses the industrial restaurant and bistro Pod Napięciem, as well as a banquet hall on its top level. The adjacent timber yard includes a railway overpass that once connected the mine to Gliwice and Bytom and now serves as an open-air stage.

Interesting facts:

The Concordia mine operated from 1841 and belonged to Karl Lazarus Henckel von Donnersmarck (owner of Zabrze). More than a decade later, the Donnersmarck coking plant and ironworks were established near the mine, and in 1801 the Amalia Mine (the first private mine in Zabrze) began its operations.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship. The complex is listed in the Register of Historic Monuments.

Guido mine
Industrial Monuments Route
Zabrze, ul. 3 Maja 93
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

A historic coal mine open for tours. This unique place in Europe was actually created in a functioning mine founded by Count Guido Henckel von Donnersmarck in 1855.  Visitors can descend to two levels, 170 and 320 metres below ground, ride on cable cars, hear the roar of combined cutter loader, navigate through narrow corridors, touch a real coal wall, and finally enjoy a slice of bread with lard. This place vividly illustrates the work of miners and the specific nature of the mine. Since 2013, it has been merged with the Coal Mining Museum in Zabrze to form a single institution called the Coal Mining Museum in Zabrze.

Interesting Facts:

The coal reserves in the mine gradually depleted (even in the 1920s). In the 1960s, the Experimental Mine M-300 was established there to test new mining machinery and equipment. In 1982, a Guido Open-Air Museum of Mining was created on the 170-metre level for tours.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Grand Prix of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2015 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Additional information:

The mine is listed on the Registry of Cultural Property. The mine is located on the Industrial Monuments Route. Guido Mine and Queen Louise Adit, as part of the Guido Mine complex, are points on the European Route of Industrial Heritage.

“Bajtel Gruba” – Park 12 C
Industrial Monuments Route
Zabrze, ul. Maurycego Mochnackiego 12
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Szombierki Heat and Power Plan
Industrial Monuments Route
Bytom, ul. Kosynierów 30
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The complex of buildings of the Bobrek power plant (Kraftwerk Oberschlesien, Kraftwerk Bobrek, Bobrek power plant, later Szombierki) from 1920, designed by Berlin architects Georg and Emil Zillmann. Covering an area of almost 18 ha, there are facilities such as the boiler house, pump house, engine house, power distribution, “Clock” water tower, coal tower, three factory chimneys, management building, guard house and surroundings.

Interesting facts:

The Bobrek power plant was opened in 1920 and ended electricity generation between 1995 and 1998 EC Szombierki (production ceased in 2011).

It was originally planned as a gunpowder factory (as can be seen from its robust and powerful construction, typical of buildings of a military nature), but due to the need to use waste coal from the Bobrek and Szombierki mines owned by the company, the building was adapted for use as a power plant. The investor was a German company owned by Joanna Gryzik, heiress to the estate of Karol Godula.

In 1925, a four-sided clock by Siemens und Halske was installed on the tower of the power plant, coupled with 54 clocks operating in the plant (during the best period of the plant around 1930, more than 900 people worked here). In 1937, The tallest of the 3 chimneys of the power plant was erected, reaching a height of 120 m. In 1945, Red Army units dismantled some of the equipment and transported it deep into Russia.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Upper Silesian Narrow-Gauge Railways
Industrial Monuments Route
Bytom, ul. Reja 1
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

This is a railway with a track gauge of 785 mm, established in the mid-19th century and primarily serving the transportation of raw materials and semi-finished products between industrial facilities in the Upper Silesian Industrial District.

Today, the Upper Silesian Narrow-Gauge Railways (in Polish: Górnośląskie Koleje Wąskotorowe) operate as a tourist railway on a portion of the former rail network with a length of 21 km, running between Bytom and Miasteczko Śląskie (now the oldest historical line).

Location of individual stations:

  • Bytom Wąskotorowy (Bytom station, from the side of Zabrzańska Street)
  • Szombierki Elektrownia
  • Bytom Karb Wąskotorowy (end of Reja Street in Bytom)
  • Dąbrowa Miejska (request stop)
  • Sucha Góra (Łokietka Street near the former Jopka plant)
  • Kopalnia Srebra (Staffa Street, a 7-minute walk to the silver mine)
  • Tarnowskie Góry Wąskotorowe (near Blachnicki Roundabout, Bytomska Street)
  • Lasowice Zalew
  • Miasteczko Śląskie Zalew (about a 5-minute walk from the Miasteczko Śląskie Reservoir)
  • Miasteczko Śląskie Wąskotorowe
Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Ficinus Housing Estate
Industrial Monuments Route
Ruda Śląska, ul. Kubiny
Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The Ficinus Housing Estate is one of the oldest workers’  colonies in Upper Silesia, dating back to the second half of the 19th century (1860 – 1867). It was established for the workers of the Gottessegen mine (later renamed Błogosławieństwo Boże with the Andrzej Shaft) and founded by one of the branches of the Henckel von Donnersmarck family. Approximately 90% of the residential buildings have been preserved, forming a compact complex consisting of 16 detached four-family houses (the outbuildings were demolished due to their poor technical condition). Each flat consisted of a porch, kitchen, and a small room, with outbuildings and small cultivated fields located behind them. The architecture of the estate has a rural-industrial character and is distinguished by its unusual construction material: the buildings were built using natural sandstone from local quarries, rather than bricks as in the case of typical familoks [multi-family houses built for coalminers]. The buildings are currently owned by the city, and revitalisation works were carried out in the 1990s (including the creation of commercial and service premises).

Interesting Facts:

The name of the colony comes from Georg Ficinus, the  initiator of the estate’s construction, who was a mining councilor and the general director of the properties owned by Count Łazarz Henkel von Donnersmarck.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

See also:

For more information about the history of this unique site, please visit the website of the municipal conservator of monuments (also available in English and German).

Visitor Centre of Tyskie Browary Książęce
Industrial Monuments Route
Tychy, ul. Katowicka 9
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

It was established at the end of 2004 in one of the oldest breweries in Poland – beer has been brewed here since the beginning of the 17th century (1629). It was founded on the initiative of the Promnitz family, but it was extended by Hans Heinrich XV von Hochberg, Prince of Pszczyna, a visionary and entrepreneur.

Buildings are covered by conservation protection.

Interesting facts:

The existing buildings result from a significant expansion in the second half of the 19th century. At that time, a brewhouse, a cold store, a malthouse with an attic to store barley, two grain expansion facilities with an attic to store malt, a malt mill, a drying room and an industrial icehouse (one of the first in Europe) were built. The brewery was also equipped with a 16 HP steam engine and had electric lighting, introduced just 11 years after Thomas Edison invented the light bulb.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2005 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Obywatelski Brewery (Tichauer)
Industrial Monuments Route
Tychy, ul. Browarowa 7
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

A historic complex of several post-industrial buildings from the 19th century, built according to a unified design (as one establishment). It boasts great architectural (detailing) and historical and cognitive qualities (well-preserved spatial layout of the brewing plant). The former brewhouse and malthouse with a drying room have been converted into a restaurant, serving its own beer, an art gallery and a science and technology park. The Obywatelski Brewery has a unique spot in the industrial style: Tichauer restaurant and art gallery.

Interesting facts:

The Obywatelski Brewery was built at the end of the 19th century (between 1895 and 1897) on the initiative of Brieger Aktien Brauerei-Gesellschaft (as a competitor to the Tyskie Browary Książęce, at the time the largest in Europe) and expanded between 1919 and 1935.

At the end of the 19th century, the two breweries reached an agreement on prices, but in 1918, 90% of the shares of the Obywatelski Brewery were bought out by the administration of the Principality of Pszczyna. In 1939, Hans Heinrich XV von Hochberg, Prince of Pszczyna, and his son and director of the City Bank of Katowice founded Browary Książęce S.A. in Tychy. In 1945, the plant became the property of the State Treasury. It produced beer until 1999.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Sztygarka City Museum
Industrial Monuments Route
Dąbrowa Górnicza, ul. Legionów Polskich 69
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The building which now houses the museum was built between 1839 and 1842 on the initiative of the Management Board of the Polish Bank in Warsaw. It was the headquarters of the Western Mining District Board, and from 1889. School of Mining and Metallurgy, known as the Sztygarka. In 2010, it was opened to the public as an underground tourist route.

Interesting facts:

Construction of the Exercise Mine at the State School of Mining and Metallurgy began in 1927 in order to familiarise students with various mining equipment, take measurements in the field of ventilation and underground surveying, carry out practice drifts, etc.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Prezydent shaft, Sztygarka complex
Industrial Monuments Route
Chorzów, ul. Piotra Skargi 34 a/d
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The Prezydent shaft (formerly św. Jacek) from 1933, designed in the modernist style, is a remnant of the Prezydent mine (formerly  Prezydent Mościcki, originating from the division of the Król mine, previously Prinz Carl zu Hessen). It boasts a unique reinforced concrete structure with a height of 42 metres (maintaining the form of a headframe with inclined brace). At the time, it was one of the most modern gallows frames in Europe, equipped with two parallel wire rope drums with a diameter of 5.5 m each (capable of extracting over 320 tonnes of coal per hour). The tower was designed by engineer Ryszard Heileman from Katowice, who utilised French technological patterns. The Sztygarka Complex comprises directorate buildings, an old assembly hall, and a casino, a new casino, steiger’s residential building, mining fire station, and a liquid air storage facility. The name of the complex refers to the fact that steigers lived in one of the buildings during the interwar period. Nowadays, it functions as a hotel and gastronomic complex, including a restaurant, café, loft-style music club, and gallery (with a conference room). The site became a registered monument.

Interesting Facts:

The Król mine (formerly Prinz Karl von Hesse) was a state-owned or fiscal mine, founded at the end of the 18th century (1791) by F.W. von Reden. It was one of the oldest and longest-operating mines in the region, as well as one of the largest and best-equipped. Over time, it expanded and was divided into four mining fields: western (Św. Barbara), eastern (Św. Jacek, later Prezydent), southern (Król Piast), and northern (Wyzwolenie). In 1937, it was split into two mines: Prezydent Mościcki and Barbara-Wyzwolenie. Meanwhile, the Gräffin Laura mine (renamed Chorzów in 1936) was separated from the reserve field of the Król mine in 1780. In 1970, the Barbara-Wyzwolenie and Chorzów mines were merged into one called Barbara-Chorzów, while the Prezydent mine was incorporated into the Polska mine in Świętochłowice. Both mines ceased operations in the mid- 1990s.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2013 in the competition for the Best Public Space, in the category of revitalised public space, for the Natural and Landscape Revitalisation of the gallows frame of the Prezydent Shaft in Chorzów, and in the same competition the Honourable mention of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2015 in the competition for the Best Public Space, in the category of revitalised public facility: Revitalisation of the Sztygarka Complex.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Central Museum of Firefighting
Industrial Monuments Route
Mysłowice, ul. Stadionowa 7a
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

A museum presenting the achievements and heritage of Polish firefighting and documenting the development of firefighting history and technology in our country. It boasts more than 4,000 exhibits. The museum was opened on 14 September 1975, with its first headquarters being the buildings of the former Nazi camp on Powstańców Street in Mysłowice. In 1991, the museum was moved to Stadionowa Street in Mysłowice. In 1992, the museum was incorporated into the structures of the State Fire Service and renamed the Central Museum of Firefighting.

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Silesian Puppet and Actor Theater “Ateneum”
For Children
Katowice, ul. św. Jana 10
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
The Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR),
Concerts and Music Performances
Katowice, plac Wojciecha Kilara 1
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

The headquarters of the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR) is one of the most modern music venues in Poland and Europe, built according to the design of the Tomasz Konior architectural studio. Construction began in 2012 and the inaugural concert took place in late 2014 (featuring Krystian Zimerman and the London Symphonic Orchestra, among others).

The façade of the NOSPR draws on the historical buildings of Silesia through brick pillars, plain and bright red recesses, like the windows of the familok of the Nikiszowiec mining residental estate. The interior of the building is very modern, but using natural materials: concrete, marble, wood.

It is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other iconic buildings of Katowice are located in the neighbourhood: Spodek, MCK, Silesian Museum).

Interesting facts:

The centrepiece of the building is a monumental block of coloured concrete with a 1,800-seat concert hall, an auditorium (with an area of more than 250 m2) for an orchestra of more than 120 musicians and a choir of 100 singers. In addition, the building contains approximately 400 rooms for employees. The acoustics of the NOSPR hall were supervised by a master of his craft – Yasuhisa Toyota of Nagata Acoustics, whose portfolio includes projects for the world’s best concert halls.

International Congress Centre (MCK)
Multi-Purpose Venues
Katowice, plac Sławika i Antalla 1
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

One of the largest congress centres in Poland, commissioned in 2015. It can accommodate 15,000 users at a time, with 12,000 inside the multipurpose hall itself. There are 35 conference rooms of varying sizes. The facility combines congress, conference, exhibition, trade and entertainment functions. The concept for the MCK building was to refer to the modernist architecture of the city, to take into account the proximity of the iconic Spodek building and to create a space for leisure activities. It is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other iconic buildings of Katowice are located in the neighbourhood: Spodek, NOSPR, Silesian Museum).

Interesting facts:

The green roof of the building and the observation deck of the MCK form a “Green Valley”, connecting to the Spodek. The urban and architectural concept for the building was selected in an international competition, in which the design by Warsaw-based JEMS Architekci won first place. The building is distinguished by its post-industrial aesthetic and useful design.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Grand Prix of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2016.

Silesian Museum
Museums
Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

The museum was established in 2015 on the site of the disused coal mine Katowice (formerly Ferdynand). The building is part of the Culture Zone of the City of Katowice (other icons of Katowice are located in the vicinity: Spodek, NOSPR, MCK).

The architectural concept draws on the industrial history of Silesia and the original function of the site on which it stands – which is why most of the building is underground, while on the surface there are only glazed blocks and restored historical buildings (mainly from the 19th century). The attraction is the 40 m high hoist tower of the Warsaw II shaft, to which a panoramic lift has been added, allowing visitors to reach the upper platform from where there is a view of the entire city. The building has received numerous awards.

Interesting facts:

The Silesian Museum was established by a resolution of the Silesian Parliament in 1929 and operated until the outbreak of World War II. The first permanent premises were erected in 1939. It was one of the most modern exhibition facilities in Europe in the modernist style. Unfortunately, it never functioned – shortly after the outbreak of World War II, it was demolished by the Germans (the exhibits were saved by being stored in the warehouses of the Upper Silesian Museum in Bytom, although some of the collections were destroyed and dispersed as a result of frontline combat, the Soviet war commissioner’s administration and looters). For 33 years, the Museum was housed in the former Grand Hotel on the Market Square in Katowice (built in 1984, designed by the architect Ignatz Gruenfeld).

Awards and honourable mentions:

Grand Prix Award 2014 of the Association of Architects of the Republic of Poland in the Architecture of the Year competition and the Grand Prix award of the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2015 in the competition for the Best Public Space.

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2018 in the competition for the Best Public Space (“Revitalisation of the historic buildings of the Main Bath and the Carpentry Shop together with the adjacent area of the former Katowice mine and construction of the necessary infrastructure for the Silesian Museum in Katowice”).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Silesian Freedom and Solidarity Centre and the Monument to the Wujek Nine
Museums
Katowice, ul. Wincentego Pola 38
Website Directions
Tak
Paid admission
Description:

A museum set up in a historic building, more than 100 years old, which is part of the Wujek mine. Before World War II, it was used as a place for filling miners’ lamps with carbide and later as a warehouse for working clothes. Yet, the Museum is so much more than just an exhibition — it is a witness to history, the site of the tragic events of 16 December 1981, when shots were fired from the building’s ramp, killing nine miners of the Wujek Mine. This creates a truly solemn atmosphere. One undeniable advantage of the Museum is the possibility to arrange visits accompanied by witnesses of those events.

Interesting facts:

The new main exhibition opened on the 40th anniversary of the Pacification of the Wujek Mine. The exhibition is primarily devoted to the December 1981 strike at the Wujek Mine and Polish resistance to the communist system in the 1980s.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Honourable mention by the Marshal of the Silesian Voivodeship in 2022 (co-winner), in the competition for the Best Public Space.

“Walcownia” Museum of Zinc Metallurgy
Museums
Katowice, ul. 11 Listopada 50
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The facility presents the history of the development of zinc metallurgy in Upper Silesia in a post-industrial exhibition space of more than 5,000 m2, in the halls of a former zinc rolling mill. The centre-piece of the exhibition is a unique technological line for the production of zinc sheets, consisting of equipment such as smelting furnaces, a heating furnace for zinc plates, a casting carousel, preliminary and finishing rolling mills, and sheet metal cutting shears. Additionally, the museum houses a collection of four original steam engines that were used in the past to power machinery in the rolling mill.

The museum also boasts one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of vintage Harley-Davidson and Indian motorcycles in Poland. The motorcycle models in the collection date from 1920 to 1986. These motorcycles have been meticulously restored and are in good working condition. During periodic “Machine Start-up” events, the motorcycles are started and showcased to visitors. Since 2016, visitors have had the opportunity to view a collection of over 50 antique stationary combustion engines manufactured by Jacob Peping. These engines span the entire 20th century and provide insight into the history of internal combustion engine development. The museum also houses both small workshop engines that were used to power equipment like lathes and saws, as well as powerful 12-cylinder engines capable of driving large machinery and even ships.

Interesting facts:

The late 18th and early 19th centuries saw Upper Silesia’s intensive industrialisation and urbanisation due to the local natural resources. The ensuing economic changes quickly transformed the agricultural region into one of Europe’s largest industrial centres, operating until the late 1980s and early 1990s. Mines were established in large numbers: firstly of calamine (used to make brass), then of coal; ironworks were built, and attempts were made to smelt zinc (a still little-known technology). The first successful attempts at melting zinc took place in 1792 at the glassworks in Wesoła belonging to the estate of the Pszczyna Princes (by Johann Christian Ruhberg). The importance or even the breakthrough for the history of metallurgy is evidenced by the special protection of this new technology (the author of this feat was nicknamed the “Silesian Faust”); The technology involved liquefying its volatile state while eliminating air. A muffle (i.e. a hermetically sealed chamber made of refractory materials, e.g. clay, steel, chamotte, heated from the outside), modelled on glass pots, was used to do so. Despite the great secrecy, other industrialists soon learned the details. And as early as 1837, as many as 49 plants were melting this metal in the area. Over time, four major manufacturers emerged: Prince Hohenlohe in Wełnowiec and Prince Donnersmarck in Nowa Wieś, as well as Silesian mines and zinc works in Lipiny and Georg von Giesche’s Erben concern (Bergwerksgesellschaft Georg von Giesches Erben). In Szopienice, the Wilhelmina zinc works was established in 1834. Later, further metallurgical plants were built nearby, e.g. Uthemann, Bernhardi, Walter Croneck. In the early 20th century, the Szopienice metallurgical plant produced almost 25,000 tonnes of zinc and employed more than 2,100 people).

Additional information:

The site is located on the Industrial Monuments Route of the Silesian Voivodeship.

Silesian Philharmonic
Concerts and Music Performances
Katowice, ul. Sokolska 2
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The Philharmonic was founded in 1945. From its earliest days, it has been very active in promoting music, organising concerts, also outside its premises. In 2011, it was named in memory of Henryk Mikołaj Górecki.

The building that houses the Silesian Philharmonic was built in 1873 at what was then Karlsstraße 2 (now Sokolska Street). The building was constructed in neoclassical style. It was renovated between 2010 and 2013.

Symfonia Centre for Music Learning and Education
Concerts and Music Performances
Katowice, ul. Zacisze 3
Website Directions
Nie
Admission is free
Description:

The building was constructed between 2005 and 2007. It was designed by KoniorStudio. The new building is connected to the main building via a glazed atrium.  The newly built part houses, among other things, a concert hall for approximately 400 people, an education centre and libraries.

Awards and honourable mentions:

Best Public Space in the Silesian Voivodeship in 2008

Silesian Theatre
Theathres
Katowice, ul. Rynek 10
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Korez Theatre
Theathres
Katowice, plac Sejmu Śląskiego 2
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

The theater was founded in 1990 by Michał Bryś (later replaced by Mirosław Neinert), Bogdan Kalus and Grzegorz Wolniak. Since 1997, the theater has been based in the so-called December Palasta. The stage of the Korez Theater is one of the smaller theater stages. It hosts own performances, guest performances and non-theatrical performances. The theater is a co-organizer of the Summer Theater Garden.

Silesian Puppet and Actor Theater “Ateneum”
Theathres
Katowice, ul. św. Jana 10
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Description:

One of the oldest puppet groups in Poland, existing since 1945. The current repertoire is addressed mainly to children, both as classic fairy tales and contemporary items. The theater is located in a historic, neo-baroque tenement house from the end of the 19th century, at św. John 10.

Since 2002, the theater has been organizing the International Puppet Theater Festival “Katowice – for Children”.

Kleks’ Fairy Tale (Bajka Pana Kleksa)
For Children
Katowice, ul. Porcelanowa 23
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
“Światowid” Studio Cinema
Art Cinemas
Katowice, ul. 3 Maja 7
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Rialto Cinema
Art Cinemas
Katowice, ul. św. Jana 24
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
„Kosmos” Studio Cinema
Art Cinemas
Katowice, ul. Sokolska 66
Website Directions
Nie
Paid admission
Rondo Sztuki Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Katowice
Art Galleries
Katowice, Rondo im. gen. Jerzego Ziętka 1